Italian police seize thousands of bottles of counterfeit "super Tuscan" wine

There is no research that shows there aren’t expensive wines that are very good, or cheap ones that are very bad, just that there’s almost no correlation and no one can reliably tell anything about a wine by taste alone.

It me…

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That’s what we’re all chasing, right? Sure, it doesn’t have any value to the people who trying to make bettter wines, nor perhaps even to the oenophile. But it’s something that most industrial wines don’t offer,

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My current favorite tipple is the Costco Kirkland brand of Sangria; light, sweet, great to drink after a couple hours of yard work, doesn’t get me dopey fast, and an excellent bargain at $7 per 450ml bottle.

I have a family member who introduced me to Super Tuscans many years ago. They’re quite good. Definitely better than the $15/bottle stuff I would normally buy myself.

I sent this article to him and he reminded me that Sassicaia in particular was one of his favorites–but NOT because of how it tastes. It tastes fine and all, but he stopped drinking it when other people started bidding up the price. He ended up selling his collection of Sassicaia (which he originally bought for $35/bottle) at an auction for over $2,000/bottle.

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Super Tuscans aren’t real Tuscans. They are fake Tuscans made by using French-originated varietals but grown in Tuscany. Fake is a strong word but useful to explain the irony of a Super Tuscan being counterfeited. Non-conforming might be a better term.

Agreed. Cheap and expensive wine are made using the same basic processes and have the same objective quality measures (acid content, alcohol, glycerol etc). So, yes, one is technically not worse than the other. But they are different from each other, and consumer preferences for one or the other support the pricing.

The circumstances of a wine session are hard to control. Bottle variation from corks or rough transportation happens. Timing and aeration. Food changes the perception of the drink. The environment does too - good wine outside in a breeze is wasted IMO; decent cheap stuff works just as well. Emotional state, expectations, fatigue, and intoxication must play a part. Just paying attention makes a huge difference.

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“The investigation began by chance when two members of the Guardia di Finanza came upon a case of the fake wine on a street in Empoli, in Tuscany, which had probably fallen from a truck,” said Giuseppe Creazzo, chief prosecutor in Florence, during a press conference. “In the case was a note with two mobile phone numbers…”

Two cases fall off a truck and into the cops’ lap, and included are phone numbers.

Way too convenient — not that I’m complaining. :slightly_smiling_face:

I wonder if an imbedded ‘agent’ or informant told of the scam and are being protected with a cover story.

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Exactly. If it tastes harsh and makes me not feel well, it’s too cheap. After that, it’s all the same to me.
Smirnoff is my value price point. Now, I don’t drink it straight, so that could be an issue with some.

Italian police say they are disposing of the counterfeit wines by pouring them out.

Six ounces at a time.

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How come no one told me there was Super Wine? I’ve been drinking the regular crap.

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The “fallen off the back of a truck” line certainly isn’t any more plausible when the cops use it; but I’d be curious to know if it’s covering for an actual informant or whether it’s something like stingrays or wiretapping, which also tend to get you some phone numbers; but cops often dislike talking about even in the vague terms ‘a confidential informant’ that they use for talking about techniques that they obviously can’t go into detail about but don’t see as having a massive PR and/or legal problem.

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I was wondering if this was a parallel construction case when they started talking about finding mobile numbers inside of a crate that fell off the truck. It seems rather implausible.

The regular crap being “Vino de Tavola?”

Essentially, some winegrowers decided that they wanted to make quality wines, but the Denominazione di Origine Controllata e Garantita associated with that region was Chianti DOCG. And Supertuscan wines are not made in the Chianti style.

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It’s not a proper wine tasting unless you spit it out before swallowing.

That sounds like a waste of good wine.

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Believe me, it wasn’t.

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:drooling_face:
Now I have to find better options for takeout and clean my keyboard.

Super wine sounds like it’s fermented from onions, sold for £1 a bottle and drunk by teenagers.

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Attica (voted Australia’s best restaurant) has started doing takeout and home delivery during the Covid lockdown - can’t imagine how much it costs.

Here’s Action Bronson having a religious experience there:

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Super wine sounds like that has lead tetraethyle to be used in high performance engines.

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That looked like a fantastic meal! I can definitely see the benefits of home delivery from a great restaurant. My reaction would be more like this, and it wouldn’t be cool to do that in public. :wink:

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