Korean Air exec arrested for macadamia nut temper tantrum

The executive who was arrested had mandated that for first class customers the nuts must be served on a plate. This individual was serves nuts in a bag. This caused this executive to illegally order the plane to turn around and boot the flight attendant off the plane.

The tantrum truly is that silly.

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What happened is that passengers in first class are to receive their nuts warmed and on a plate.

And I’m not kidding.

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‘‘Nuts!’’ ~ General Anthony C. McAuliffe

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This is why nepotism is not such a good idea.

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Can anyone imagine a person of the English-speaking one percent being called to account for this sort of behaviour?

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Both the tarmac the plane was on and the nuts being served were named after 19th century Scotsmen.

Just throwing that out there.

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That is my Favorite Fact of the Week.

Both of their first names are also John. Their lives only overlapped for 9 years, but I’m choosing to believe that they were the greatest of friends and discussed roads and nuts at great length.

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seems like having a plate full of warm spherical things bouncing around during flight is just a bad idea anyway. how many first-class passengers would’ve thrown a tantrum when turbulence tossed their tasty nuts all over the place?

The more important question here is why did the Pilot In Command play along with this? He should be held accountable for effectively delegating his authority to this woman.

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Well she was the boss, and he didn’t do his job properly. First Class is a fairly stupid concept to start with (I have flown business class for work and I find it very practical, you get the extra space you need) but for several times the price, first class has to offer these intangibles, like nuts on a plate. I think she was right to correct her employee, but wrong to go off the handle. We don’t want people doing that on aeroplanes, its dangerous.

Also I don’t see why she has been arrested in Korea for an offence committed in the US. Is it possible that this is being done to make the airline look better?

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While law in these circumstances is generally pretty complex, the rule of thumb is that on board a registered vehicle (that has not been hijacked or stolen) crimes committed aboard that vehicle even in international waters or airspace fall under the jurisdiction of the country where the vehicle is registered, unless that country for some reason cannot or refuses to prosecute.

Also, dude, no one is arguing whether anyone was in their right to “correct” their employee, why even mention this. What’s being argued is what constitutes any sort of sane definition of “correcting” said employee, especially given the minor quality of the error. Let’s refrain from even sort-of justifying, unnecessarily, the asinine behavior of the world’s entitled class. They contribute bupkiss and ruin everything they touch.

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Thank you Dave.

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I think the macadamia nuts were more of an appetizer.

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I prefer to have my nuts warmed on a plate.

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I understand where you are coming from, but this incident has more in common with telling a bus driver to return to the station on the wrong side of the road.

Yes, either situations can be safe, but no exec has the right to make that call for trivial insubordination. So she has been lawfully arrested.

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dental?

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Except the plane didn’t take off before returning to the terminal, thus no international air space, no leaving jurisdiction of the airport, and none of your examples apply.

Yes, it does, because once you board an aircraft you are considered to be in “airspace” until you disembark. The aircraft’s wheels touching the tarmac is a meaningless distinction.

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