Oakland's tech startups are reportedly being gentrified out of their spaces by deep-pocketed marijuana growers


#21

So you’re saying it’s a bubble. Anyone who gets in it needs to be in hair trigger to exit or be be stuck with a poor investment.

Hmmm… maybe developments in this space will make indoors agriculture viable. Hopefully from not just a financial, but also environmental perspective.


#23

Roger That!


#24

This has been the case in Portland for a while. I serve on the board of a nonprofit that was trying to find reasonable warehouse space at one point, but we were out of luck.


#25

Yes. But really it’s just the effect of an illicit market becoming suddenly licit. There will be massive growth and then a massive correction. In the end, though, there will be a mature market that would be ready for investment.


#26

It’s sort of like gentrification, even if it isn’t. So… ironic gentrification?


#27

Ferrification?


#28

Wherever you see some techbro getting ousted by a fellow holding a big spliff there you’ll see me Ma, because I like to smoke it up.


#29

Right … it totally makes sense to put large-ish agricultural operations indoors - with artificial lighting and climate control, in a state with some of the best growing conditions in the world not a few dozens of miles away - (using electricity piped in through aging urban infrastructure) - smack dab in the middle one of the countries most super heated real estate markets.

(the writers of this timeline are clearly high af)


#30

Exhibit A for pot makes you lazy.


#31

Surely one ‘disrupts’ a tech startup out of its place?


#32

What are the reasons pot farmers might prefer indoor hydroponics to growing outside if it’s now legal? The only thing I can think of is so their pure strain of Maui Wowie doesn’t get cross pollinated with generic skunkweed.


#33

I still wouldve thought there’d be better margins growing outside. I actually seek out bush weed as we call it in aus cause i like it milder. They just need to make it as organic or something.


#34

Until the pot/tech industry merges into its terrifying final form:

image


#35

The Netherlands (of all places) has become an agricultural giant by doing this.


#36

What’s good for the goose is good for the gander.

-me not crying a tear when techbros get outpriced by another more lucrative business.


#37

well, I guess normally one prefers hydroponics because of better control of all environmental conditions, however I wonder if the reason might not be (here I will speculate without knowledge based on my expectations of behavior in the American Conservative and ‘drug warriors’) that while it is technically legal to grow the DEA still wants it/considers it illegal and will do stuff to damage grow sites/try to arrest owners of grow sites which can perhaps be better determined by flyovers etc. outside, whereas hydroponics you definitely need a warrant which they won’t be getting as much as they might want it?


#38

Won’t the marijuana growers have to compete against the airbnb lords?


#39

That’s definitely why indoor growing started. For a long time, indoor was considered inferior to outdoor too, but in the 90s growers started seriously improving methods and breeding new, better strains, and that was mostly for the indoor market.


#40

I don’t really understand the problem. With very little knowledge of either sector I would imagine that pot would create a wider variety of types of employment. I also would guess that tech has more options in terms of appropriate built space environments in which to operate. This isn’t referring to tech manufacturing, is it?


#41

I live in southern Oregon, and the marijuana industry has definitely disrupted business as usual here. Local businesses that previously had a stranglehold on (both highly-skilled and low-skilled) employees are now finding themselves having to “play nice”, pay more, and not treat their employees like dirt, because there’s always that job at the dispensary or grow-site. And there’s a decent off-the-books market too. Rent has skyrocketed, there are very few vacancies, and real estate is getting to be southern California expensive. I love that marijuana is legal in my state, but man – it does impact the economy.

That said, it’s hard to feel anything but schadenfreude for the tech biz. While legal marijuana is disrupting everything and raising prices and changing the local economy… that’s a side effect of a popular industry that provides a variety of employment options, which includes people who previously could only work in the black market.

It’s not like there’s a dispensary with the motto, “Move fast and break things”. Marijuana growers don’t have to publicly announce that their motto is “Don’t be evil”. I’ve never bought marijuana and had to sign a EULA, or had my privacy invaded, or my personal information sold for targeted ads.