Ronald Reagan sure made great Mac and Cheese


#10

Yeah, I didn’t see the grey-on-grey URL on first (or second) glance.

I would personally prefer direct attribution and a clickable URL, but that’s me.


#11

I assume he used cheddar to make sure it didn’t trickle down onto the lower noodles.


#12

Ronnie loved jelly beans.


#13

I like my own variant on this one, which involves more breadcrumbs fried in butter then grilled on the top, roasting fresh green chillies instead of buying them in a pot, and being at least a bit drunk.


#14

Ketchup is a vegetable (per Ronnie), so add some of that and it’s not only a meal, it’s a balanced meal!


#15

“Infiltrating government positions, your agents have deliberately announced stupid policies, undermining public trust.”


:game_die: Would You LIKE to Play a Game? :video_game:
#16

Nice recipe. Sadly, due to the trickle not getting down to me (or millions of others) I could not afford the cheddar cheese for this dish…or the macaroni…or the milk…or the egg. Thus, many dinners were boiled salted water (if I could afford the salt). I would sprinkle on the paprika if I found some on the side of the road. Good times.


#17

I refuse to believe this is the best mac and cheese of all time; there’s no bacon in it.


#18

Don’t know if this is in the book, but I recall one of the Bush First Ladies once shared a recipe for “Scrambled Eggs with Cheese”, which seems like she basically couldn’t flip an omelet, so she just gave up. Not inspiring. This Mac is decent I have tried this one before.

Best White House recipe ever has to be George Washinton’s Artillery Punch.
I cannot find the original book I have it in, but here is the scaled back essence, the original had all sorts of fruit in it (box of peaches, box of oranges, etc.), and you let it stand for 2 weeks, then add the champagne at the party just the same… the original served 250!

From here:

comes this variation:

Chatham Artillery Punch
Makes 25 servings

2 ounces of green tea leaves
4 large lemons
1/2 pound turbinado or light brown sugar
1 quart dark rum
1 quart brandy
1 quart rye or bourbon whiskey
3 bottles champagne

  1. Soak the tea leaves 8 hours or overnight in a quart of cold water. Strain the liquid from the leaves into a large container that will hold all the spirits (use wooden, porcelain, or glass; do not use plastic or metal). Juice 3 lemons through a strainer into the tea and add the sugar, stirring until it is dissolved.

  2. Stir in the rum, brandy, and whiskey, cover, and let stand at room temperature for at least 8 hours or for up to a week. It’s pretty well indestructible at this point.

  3. When ready to serve the punch, thinly slice 1 lemon. To serve the punch, allow 6 cups of the base for every bottle of champagne. First pour the brew over an ice ring or large block of ice in a punch bowl. Add the sliced lemon and swirl in the champagne, being careful not to disturb its effervescence. Serve with caution.

Sounds good, right? Add your own fruits to taste and you get the idea.

For you rummies out there another good concoction is thus:

In a large crock combine by stirring away from open flame:
1 bottle (750 ml) Dark Rum (Appleton works)
1 bottle (750 ml) Golden Rum (Mt. Gay best or cheaper like Castillo is ok)
1 bottle (750 ml) Light or White Rum (anything BUT Bacardi no Bacardi ever!)
1 bottle (750 ml) High-proof Golden 151 Rum

add
1 whole peeled/topped pineapple cut into quarters
3 whole vanilla beans, sliced lengthwise

Make sure your container allows the fruit and beans to be covered completely, put on lid and set aside for a week, tap off a few ounces and serve as desired with or without ice, garnished with fresh lime. Instead of a second one have a glass of water, then you can have a second one if desired…

Don’t Drink and Drive, not even a horse-drawn carriage.


#19

Actually, cheesy scrambled eggs (with real cheese, thankyouverymuch, not processed cheese product) are quite yummy. One puts the grated cheese in the eggs pretty early in the process, so it’s not like an omelet at all.


#20

OK that raptor’s bitting arrangement doesn’t make any sense. Mechanical leverage around the lip and nose in a way that allowed it to keep its mouth open is sort of logical given that if you’re riding a predatory dinosaur it would be nice if it could use its teeth in your/its defense, but the curb isn’t attached in a way that would provide said leverage. Just sayin.


#21

That sounds more or less like Welsh rarebit on macaroni instead of toast. Sounds good!


#22

You may not love the Gipper

You got that right.


#23

I love SharpWriter’s presidential art. Here’s Bill Clinton:

George Washington:

Richard Nixon:

And of course, Dubya:


#24

Or Velveeta!


#25

I seem to remember someone came up with a jelly bean jar that was also a bust of Reagan’s head.

It was sold empty.


#26

I’ve been trying to find / recreate this stove top macaroni recipe I forgot to write down and the closest one I’ve found has dry mustard in it like this one. I tried it that way once and no, no, no, terrible. Maybe with the Worcestershire the mustard works?

It’s a little hot here for using the oven right now anyway. :sweat: I’ve barely baked anything in three months.


#27

Ye gods! Eggs? This is just a cheese custard.

Nopenopenopenopenope.

Make a roux – butter and, say, six tablespoons of flour (amount not critical). Whisk on medium low heat to toast the flour a bit. Then add a bit of milk, stir till it thickens, add a bit more, repeat until all the milk is in.

Cheddar is traditional but I like it better with a mix of cheeses. You can use nearly anything melty.Take the thickened milk off heat and whisk it all in a bit at a time. I use about half sharp cheddar, and half other things like gruyere and manchego.

The mustard and worcestershire are good additions. I find cayenne essential.

Elbows are traditional but pretty much anything either tubular or with a lot of nooks and crannies works. I’ve used small ziti, gemelli and rotini successfully. BTW, this is a very good application for whole grain pasta. It adds a heartiness that is pretty tasty.

Get off the train here if you like your macaroni creamy. If you like it southern style, pour it into a pyrex baking dish. Then cook some Panko and garlic in a pan with either butter or olive oil until the panko is toasted brown. Mix with parmesan and sprinkle the mixture over the macaroni. Bake for about 30 minutes or so at 375, until bubbly. Remove and let sit for 10 minutes or so.

This recipe sounds like an omelette with noodles. Yuck.


#28

Sharp cheddar, no starch, no emulsifier, and 40 minutes in the oven. Is there any chance that this wouldn’t be utterly broken, with all the cheese reduced to rubbery, polymerized curds floating in a sea of expressed water and deep slicks of millkfat grease?

Somehow that seems appropriate.


#29

Being a fan of Nixon, Reagan & W, I’m definitely buying those!