As America's middle class collapses, no one is buying stuff anymore


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Conspicuously absent: a strategy to pay their poorest employees more so that they can then buy the products they make.

+1 Feudalism!


#3

Just need to move more manufacturing abroad where they can make it cheap enough that the now un-employed back home can… oh, wait…


#4

I keep getting emails from Amazon about job opportunities, but they are in Seattle, and I know that amazon are horrible to work for.


#5

From the Amazonians I know personally (mostly Irvine office people), they say it’s not terrible to be a developer… at least not much more terrible than being a developer anywhere else. The only negatives they harp on is high-stress, anonymous rating, and Amazon corp’s cheapness.


#6

Yeah thats my problem with them.


#7

That’s not unusual for businesses in the Silicon Valley halo, though.


#8

I often wonder about the sanity of big business…

I mean seriously, what did they think the long-term outcomes of bribing right-wing politicians to impoverish your own customers was going to be exactly?


#9

Who cares about long-term? You get to be an executions for a couple of years, you’re made for life. Long-term is someone else’s problem.


#10

They don’t think long term, they only think ‘PROFIT!!’ So they don’t see that not having people buy your stuff can hurt you in the long run and you go out of business.


#11

Wow, what a ringing endorsement. I’m not really seeing how any of that actually refutes the “it’s horrible to work at Amazon” argument…


#12

If you want to fight for social justice, you have to start by fighting for economic and environmental justice. You can’t build a chimney from the top.


#13

You need cash’ola to buy the crap’ola.


#14

Oh great. I guess now that the ‘big guys’ are noticing, maybe somebody will start caring at some point… Maybe, but I’m not holding my breath.

As a small-scale, self-employed person, it feels like there is no amount of fine-tuning my product, spending on marketing, and generally improving my craft that can help the fact that the vast majority of people who already do love my work and want to buy it simply cannot afford it, however cheap I try to make it. When you’re not even in competition with other sellers/products but with basic rent and groceries, you are living in an barely-sustainable economy.


#15

Well thats the core thing really, whilst it’s kinda understandable in a sociopathic way for the previous 5-35+ years, it’s the current crop that confuse me…

They’re literally killing off the very last of their consumer base, at detriment to everyone. Yet they don’t seem to care even about their own profits they’re killing even in the short term, let alone future generations…


#16

I think that’s a good thing. Classism is a lot of primitive BS. And the old industrial age production/consumption model is obsolete.

Long live your economy!


#17

Don’t worry! Starbucks has decided that it needs to form a charity dedicated to small businesses.

This will save jobs somehow.

The Starbucks-OFN literature also ignores the main reason small businesses have trouble getting credit: most of them fail, and as such are viewed as too risky by many banks in the post-bubble credit crunch. In Starbucks’s ideological universe, these risky investments shouldn’t be bet on by already-wealthy financiers, their traditional lenders; they are a charitable project, to be crowd-sourced for donated funds, because there is something inherently wholesome about the small ones—and they will ‘create jobs.’ This is a startling conception of for-profit businesses as humanitarian enterprises.


#18

I take it every American in this thread is a registered Democrat intent on voting for Sanders in the primaries.


#19

I vividly recall hearing Sean Hannity on his radio show back around 2004 explaining to one of his listeners that tax cuts for the rich were better for the economy because they would use that extra wealth to buy another home or yacht or car, which would in turn pay the wages of home-builders and auto-plant workers, etc.

My immediate thought was “uhhh. . . wouldn’t it be even better to give the (much larger) middle class a tax cut, so they can afford to buy their first home, and a new car instead of a used one?”


#20

Anyone promoting trickle-down is a fuckwit or an arsehole.