As Walter White was to meth, so is the “Drug Wizard of Wichita” to Fentanyl


#1

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#2

Oh, the old german chemistry manuals, some even typeset in Schwabacher/Fraktur… Lots of basic lab techniques and syntheses of all kind can be found in them.

We need more such people out there. Way way more.


#3

Why in the fuck would any human put that in their body?


#4

I scored for some 7-day transdermal fentanyl patches once. I took it off after it shut down all my peristaltic muscles and I didn’t piss for two days. I was super fucking high though.


#5

We do need more people who like to tinker and learn things in depth, but really don’t need more more illegal drug manufacturers willing to sell recreational drugs with high death tolls if the price if right.


#6

I have some purple kryptonite bud for that, and you can piss yourself silly, in the bathroom please.


#7

I was never a fan of super strong weed. Lethal opiates, fuck yeah. Made me feel nice. I don’t even drink now though.


#8

We need a widespread ability to manufacture arbitrary substances, from nanoparticles to polymers to pharmaceuticals including but not limited to painkillers. Once you have that, you cannot not-have a subset, though. A negligible cost for a large benefit. And a benefit itself if you want such substance for yourself.

I am toying with a couple concepts to facilitate this, including microreactors and cheap spectrometers… Not easy, even a stupid echelle grating can be pretty costly, but should be doable, especially with the emerging 2-photon polymerization 3d printing that has accuracy limit somewhere near 100 nm and could be used, with subsequent metalization, for printing reflective optical components… Then there’s the software defined radio that can provide a platform for NMR and other techniques, microwave chemistry to work around the need for high temperature/pressure for certain classes of reactions, sonochemistry, photocatalysts for oxidation, organic electrochemistry… a wide field of approaches that can be miniaturized to desktop scale.


#9

I really should get back to Denver…


#10

“Need” is probably not the right word.


#11

I’m looking at the “we” part. Who am I to say what someone else needs?


#12

Well, yeah, I’m certainly not part of that “we,” though I can’t identify anyone who’d have that as a need rather than a want.


#13

I’ll take his word for it that he needs it. Or thinks so. Same difference.

I only hope the suffering is not too great.


#14

Strictly said, everything is a want. For something to be a need, a requirement to be satisfied by the need has to be specified (bare survival, a given degree of comfort, etc…). Which is usually a want. Do you need to live? Or just want to?


#15

I’m pretty sure I need to hit the road and not spend time in a dragged out discussion of needs vs. wants (and related matters) to the point that I’d wind up wanting a device to manufacture pharmaceuticals to ease the psychological pain.


#16

nah, Fentanyl will suffice, who needs wants anyhow?


#17

In the world according to me, you should have the choice of not having that device and its associated benefits and risks. You however should not have the right to deny that device to me.


#18

This kind of thinking works fine if you’re a narcissist/solipsist, for the rest of us not so much. Since you don’t live in your world, but ours, you might become frustrated with your plan, feel free to try it out though.


#19

The physics and technology are the final arbiters, not you. There are many people out there who want all sorts of things, and are motivated to acquire the tech. Check the maker forums out there. And check everybody complaining about the price of their meds, or the unavailability of a med that helps them in the place where they are because of silly bureaucratic differences.

Even in the field of materials there can be quite some problems. Try to get small amount of PEDOT:PPS for a test of an idea for a price that won’t break the budget. Or some cyanide for electroplating.

Let’s start with the spectrometers, as a feedback and quality control are a must, even for conventional markets. IMS FTW.

Luckily you don’t make the rules.


#20

conscience might play a role, if it does.