AT&T disconnects whole families from the internet because someone in their house is accused of copyright infringement


#21

I’m with you on this.

But this post about this article doesn’t make a convincing case to me. MANY notices sent, and what were the replies?

ISP’s (er, the ones that send notices, unlike Monkeybrains, the best ISP ever) should have teams to help better identify infringement and show users how to stop being detected, like using TOR or a good VPN to… wait… what do we want ISP’s to do, exactly?

This is a shitshow, there’s no question. But what should the process be for a copyright holder? What should an ISP do? If we agree that a copyright holder should have some recourse, what should that be??


#22

Provide the utility that they provide and keep it flowing. Just like the electric, water, and other utilities.

File a lawsuit against the alleged infringer and present evidence in court to attempt to prove the defendant guilty. Get fined for frivolous lawsuits / barratry / etc. Stop that nonsense and go do something productive.


#23

It convinces me.

We’ll need to resurrect Dante since companies like AT&T and Comcast deserve to be cast into a lower level of hell than any he described. As do their sycophants.


#24

The value of piracy, at least for me, was never about convenience. It’s clear now that convenience has a lot to do with the early success of digital piracy, but the people that built pirate infrastructure weren’t motivated by convenience. I see no difference between a pirate and a librarian. Open culture and piracy are inextricably linked. It’s no accident that emergence of prefigurative models like indymedia and text mobs thrived at the same time as Napster and The Pirate Bay, and that they declined as Facebook, Twitter, and Netflix came to prominence.


#25

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