Baidu browser isn't just a surveillance tool, it's a remarkably sloppy one


#1

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#2

“sloppy one”

Nobody likes that, indeed.


#3

Sounds like a big data goldmine if some entrepreneurial spirit managed to intercept and hoard this data. I wonder if someone’s already on it.


#4

I’m sure there’s been No Such Attempt.


#5

Are we at the point where free software is like free food and shelter - no expectations of quality, privacy, or security are justified.

The scary part is when you’ve already paid and receive the same shitshow…


#6

I’m always a bit surprised when I see yet another ‘chinese software/firmware a complete disaster, not even competently malicious.’ story.

It just seems strange compared to say, Russia and the former Soviet republics, where despite the fairly nasty economic collapse and comparatively limited domestic electronics industries, quite a lot of programming talent emerged.

I would have expected that China wouldn’t be obviously worse off than those countries in terms of producing programming talent, and that it would be actively encouraged now that dubious software quality is one of the major factors keeping successful OEM/ODM hardware outfits from becoming internationally successful vendors, rather than just contractors for western companies who supply the badge, localization, and firmware that isn’t a total disaster.

The fact that Baidu’s approach to privacy combines the worst of our marketing analytics weasels and a surveillance state is no surprise; but why that level of lousiness?


#7

Baidu was notified of these vulnerabilities prior to Citizen Lab’s publication, and has apparently patched some of the issues Citizen Lab identified.

They notified a software manufacturer of a security weakness? Isn’t that a felony?

Oh, I see. They’re Chinese. So it’s an act of war instead.


#8

There is a widespread perception that there is no such thing as quality in anything that has been produced in China for a century and that perception isn’t completely unwarranted. I think it’s a given now, especially in tech, that anything that is made in China is highly suspect, and that is a very sad thing, given China’s rich artistic and cultural history.


#9

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