Decision to retain personally identifying information puts Australian census under threat


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/08/04/decision-to-retain-personally.html


#2

This data couldn’t possibly leak. We have Norton.


#3


#4

Ridiculous.

Also, I had forgotten how fantastic the colours were in that last mad max movie.


#5

You should see the B&W silent film version. I have. And it’s cinematic genius.


#6

Read article twice. Agree that fmr Cdn PM Harper is a dumpster fire.

About this article, I can’t figure out if the general problem is that long-form census’ are bad or good or it’s just that they shouldn’t keep it for 10 years, or that it’s being stored online.

I use old census forms for geneology and I can’t imagine not having this old data for family information. The US releases historic census data after 72 years; it’s 92 in Canada, 100 in UK (and effectively 99 in Australia, but they destroy all data anyway either through dereliction or direct policy).

Just store this stuff securely offline, off-network, local secure access only. End of story.


#7

The fumetto-version is likewise a work of art unto itself.


#8

I have difficulty understanding why this is even controversial. The UK census keeps personal information for ever, and always has done. It makes it publicly available after a century. Certainly it should be kept securely, offline and preferably on paper only, but that’s a separate topic from merely retaining such information which will be of inestimable value to future researchers.


#9

But it is being pushed to be completed online, with all of the security you could expect from bureaucrats who have already had a dozen data breaches in the last few years. Future researchers can take a jump as far as many of us are concerned, seeing as the trade off is all of our personal data being unnecessarily put at risk.


#10

“This is a disaster. Without accurate census figures, there’s evidentiary footing on which to plan policy, nor any reliable way of assessing the outcomes of policy.”

Oh please. Spell out a couple of examples of “policy” that can only possibly work with a broad population census.


#11

The site’s down, anyway… So I don’t see how they can fine everyone who didn’t complete the census, when that number is in the millions and there’s no way to tell couldn’t from wouldn’t.

It’s an epic shitfight. Heads must roll.


#12

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