Dell's making great laptops again


#1

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#2

I’ll believe this if its still true in 2020.


#3

It’s almost as if devoting a company to shareholder value maximization is a bad idea.


#5

Here’s the thing: it’s not like it was bought by the Dell Family, and Maw and Paw are in the CEO office in their rocking chairs. It was bought by private equity - as in Mitt Romney - and private equity does not have much track record of manufacturing good products. Their track record is spinning off unprofitable divisions such as R&D, looting pension funds, loading up on debt and cashing out to the investors.

So yea, come back in 2020.


#6

They have a pretty good track record of extracting all the wealth from a perfectly healthy set of assets then leaving those assets in an unsustainable state while redistributing and concentrating that wealth into the pockets of the least number of people possible.

Why is it that wealth redistribution is only a “Bad Thing™” when going from rich to poor, but when going from poor to rich it’s just “economics”.


#7

What do you think privately held companies generally do? It’s not like when a company goes private, it suddenly doesn’t have shareholders.


#8

Excellent question that should be asked everywhere – loud and constantly. I think it’s because the rich have gotten so good at, and so ruthless about, paying people to produce effective propaganda.


#9

“again”? this implies they made great ones in the past.


#10

Their monitors have always been excellent.


#11

They have had some duds(if I see one more e173FP that has burned out its backlight inverter…); but their basic policy of buying the same panels as everyone else, putting them in a bland-but-not-atrocious case, and selling them with more video inputs for less money certainly has a lot of fans.


#12

They’re still Perot Systems by any other name. I’ll pass.


#13

I can’t speak for all of them, but I have a 2408WFP that has served faultlessly for nearly a decade now. Amazing device.


#14

The difference is that it’s harder to offload the shares, so they’re by necessity in for the long haul. The problem is not maximising shareholder value per se, but maximising investors return over silly short time scales.


#15

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