Drone-it-yourself kit


#1

"The DIY (Drone It Yourself) v1.0 kit offers you the opportunity to turn any object into a drone*, simply by attaching four motors and a control unit -- no technical know-how needed. The kit consists of multiple parts that are easy to assemble and can be attached to a wide range of different objects" DIY… READ THE REST


#2

Shall we buzz the NSA buildings?


#3

No,no. You clip enough of them to it and the NSA building buzzes you.


#4

I think we'll be seeing a lot more of this in the future.


#5

It would be cool to build a custom case to hold the various disassembled parts that would also serve as the fuselage of the completed quadcopter drone. Maybe some kind of aerodynamic alebrije, or an equally whimsical art project.


#6

Ooh! Can we make a drone that attaches these to government drones and then flies off with them?

Because that would also be funny!


#7

I love hate to be pedantic, but that's an RC quadcopter, not a drone.


#8

I wonder how many it would take to lift a guy sitting in a lawnchair ...


#10

The bigger fear could be the nano-drone. Coming soon too a community near you to view all your consumer habits. .


#11

Average American male? So... 250+ at 5' 7"? Add 20 pound every inch increase. Need more throttle.


#12

Sorry, dirty foreigner here, you'll have to use real measurements. But I did account for your habits - as my dear old grandfather would say, Americans are like work trucks - They tend to carry a few ton on the back end.

(Okay not really, I worked with the assumption that your average american male was 88 kilos, which is the actual figure.)


#13

280? And likely some sort of support framework to ensure that the ones above don't interfere with the ones below, so call it 300 drones.

I wonder if you'd need a pilot's license? "kzkrk Tower, this is Delta Lawnchair 101 requesting clearance ..."


#14

The main article doesn't say how much each drone can lift, but given what the creators say it can lift, I think 2 pounds (1 kilo) is likely. I misunderstood earlier and read 280 engines as 280 drones, but you are saying 70 drones. Given my reasoning, I have to say 300 drones would do it. That would be 600 pounds at full throttle. At 50% power, then, you should have enough lifting power for a man, chair, drone support structure and a cooler of beer.

Another thought. Given that the thing has propellers and engines, would it qualify as a micro-light aircraft? Or does a craft have to be fixed wing to qualify? How about helicopter?


#15

300 motors is a good round figure, I suppose, but you'll need to factor in batteries, too. I'll admit the math is rough as guts, but I'm not working it out from the creator kits and weight of that kit, I worked it out by pulling the parts list and going by engine power and prop size from the recommended props - but your method isn't really inferior, just different rough math for the same result.

I have genuinely no idea what it would qualify as, but definitely not a microlight - you're right, you do need a fixed wing to qualify for that, IIRC. I don't even know if there is a qualification for helicopters that small.


#16

Batteries are already factored into the weight of each drone. After all, they already have to lift themselves as well as whatever they are carrying. Oh, one thing is relatively easy to do. Since they are radio controlled, it should be simple enough to change the frequencies on each drone to respond to the command transmitter. The support structure would be a bit complicated. You have to try to keep the propellers from interfering with each other.


#17

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