Electric Mini available next year

And there we go, the obligatory faux-confusion about units. Obviously you already know who uses miles. Obviously you also know how to convert them. Presumably any educated person can do it in their head, but anyone at all can type “148 miles in km” into google.

What purpose does this performance serve? Why does someone always have to do it?

(Also, apropos the subject matter of the article: yawn. BMW seems to be all about calling it in when it comes to EVs, after letting their strong-ish start with the i3 fizzle. And I wonder if they’re even going to sell the Mini EV in the USA… although since the range is stated in miles I suppose maybe they are, oh no I’ve given the answer to question 2 away.)

There are various BEV pickups said to be well on their way to production, e.g. Rivian. I haven’t followed them in particular since I’m not in the market for a pickup. (Is “pickup” the right word for people who call a station wagon an “estate”? I think so but I’m not sure.)

1 Like

We still use miles in UK, where there are a lot of Minis. It will go down a storm here.

2 Likes

Honestly? I live in Munich. Home of BMW. Germany doesn’t have miles. But I do see a lot of posts assuming miles are ubiquitous.

Consider this a reminder that only a minority uses miles these days.

5 Likes

It is. But I want a car. With 4-5 seats, the rear of which I can fold down to make a large load-carrier. We call them estate cars. Because we only use them on our estates, as opposed to only driving them to the station.

2 Likes

Everyone knows this. Nobody cares. What’s your position, that every article should use SI units only? (Why? See below.) That every article should use both SI and Imperial units? (With both U.S. and British variants in the case of volume?) That every article should use all known systems of units (there are others after all)? Maybe there should be a mandatory configuration setting to choose units, so nobody needs to be triggered by seeing something mildly unfamiliar?

The SI-only option has of course the same liability as the Imperial option does – they won’t be the native system of units for some readers. So, sez I, write the article however you want and assume your reader is intelligent enough to convert as needed.

Relax, have a beer. You live in Munich, there’s plenty to be had.

2 Likes

There should be an html attribute that specifies a value should be displayed in local units of measure.

Not that this the place for that. Anyone know if it exists?

7 Likes

Do you speak Esperanto too?

2 Likes

This is a great solution for making the most people happy.

Barring the people who definitely want half the people to be unhappy, even when it makes no difference to them.

Cue: Outraged defence of not pandering to other people and expecting them to just use whatever’s harder and less comfortable for them.

3 Likes

That’s because most of us are in unenlightened places that still use imperial measurements.

5 Likes

I remember when I had a car that kept getting a flat tire because the hubcap would spin and press on the stem (long dumb story). This flat tire (tyre, thai-er) thing for you must have a story behind it. What are you driving on? Do you feel you have more than your fair share of flats?

Also folks, just get a Chevy Bolt, long range, and cheaper now that they are discontinued. Sadly does not come with a spare, but they are super zippy.

3 Likes

For good or for ill, a majority of people in the English-speaking world still use miles. If this was a German-language blog then I’d understand your confusion on why the post didn’t state range in Kilometers instead.

1 Like

The last remaining drawback to electric vehicles: required time to “gas-up”. That is, how long to a full recharge? hours and hours. And the obvious answer to that remains: standardize the batteries, engineer them to be automate-dly swappable, and, design a ‘gas station’ which swaps depleted batteries for charged up ones that go around an endless chain of recharging at the station. So why no motion in that direction to date? (“cuz standardization is an anti-capitalistic process you @#$! you”)

1 Like

In the end, I was being facetious. I had hoped to be mischievous rather than grumpy, if it helps.

Editing to add that it didn’t help that I spent the evening browsing a subreddit called “Shit Americans say” which had primed my snark.

6 Likes

There have been business efforts in that direction but they haven’t really gained much traction.

3 Likes
1 Like

Discontinued? Since when? Are you thinking of the Volt, by any chance?

Yes, but this problem is less severe than often imagined by people who haven’t lived with an EV. Most EV owners typically charge them overnight in their driveways, garages, etc, start the day with a full battery, and find that’s more than sufficient for a day’s driving. So the effective time to “gas-up” is nil (since it’s when the car would be parked anyway).

The two (quite valid) criticisms of this are people who don’t have dedicated parking (e.g. apartment dwellers) and road trips. To the first, yes, it’s a problem, imperfectly solved at present. To the second, DCFC doesn’t take “hours and hours” for a charge, it ordinarily takes more like 15-45 minutes, depending. In many cases, it takes no longer than a trip to the bathroom and the snack bar. And in any case, it’s getting better and even at current speeds, the tradeoff between “zero time” refueling at home and somewhat slower refueling on a road trip, is a win for many drivers (me!) who take only occasional road trips. I mean, EVs aren’t for everyone (yet), there are plenty of edge cases they can’t handle – but I assert that even with current limitations they’re a better set of tradeoffs for the majority of drivers.

The battery swap thing was actually trialed by Tesla. They had a swap station between SF and LA. The take rate was very low and they closed it.

6 Likes
2 Likes

Eh. Those will come eventually. It is inevitable. For instance, next year’s all-electric Volvo XC40 will satisfy a lot of people looking in that segment.

Of course, whether they carry spare tires is a totally different matter. Lots of new ICE vehicles have dropped the spare tire too.

3 Likes

I do seem to have had more than my fair share of flats, but that is not the point.

The can of foam option is simply no good in either of the two scenarios it is designed for.

  1. shredded tyre or otherwise beyond foam - need to wait for someone to find and bring a spare wheel or come and tow you to a tyre shop. A spare would get you going (even a skinny) and you can stop to buy your new tyre at - to some extent - your convenience
  2. puncture - foam will get you going but render your puncture unrepairable, and it must be replaced as per foam usage guidelines. So what was a £20 repair comes to (in my case) over £100

It is not about what’s best for the car owner, it is all about reducing weight so manufacturers can claim lower ICE emissions or greater battery range.

3 Likes

Is too small, - well, short - load length-wise. And it won’t have a spare - not even a skinny.

1 Like