Evidently blowing on video game cartridges did not help

It just seemed like the logical thing to do.

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Maybe it didn’t work on Atari, but it definitely worked on the Intellivision cartridges. :wink:

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That’s actually based on something though. The earliest Polaroid films you had to peel after they were shot to develop/reveal the image. The surface was still wet and gently shaking or waving to dry it was common.

It just stuck around well after they came up with better, self contained self developing films.

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no it didn’t, but you know what did help? Breathing on them. It would ‘wet’ the contacts and make a better connection. To this day I swear it worked.

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Nobody was blowing on Atari 2600 cartridges… those just worked and the blowing thing was purely NES dealing with their shit cartridge slot design. Just taking it out and putting it back in was likely enough.

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I think it was the 10NES chip that really caused the problem

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I bought a modded GameBoy SP with IPS screen (which looks AMAZING by the way) off Etsy

and surprisingly with some of the old GBA carts I bought off eBay, some of them had trouble booting, I got the garbled Nintendo logo, which is a neat story in itself:

I had to clean the contacts (both cart and GB) with isopropyl alcohol on a Q-Tip and then it was fine. There was visible dirt on the Q-Tip after I did this. I don’t think any amount of blowing would have fixed this one :wink:

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It’s always the DRM.

DRM is the reason most modern tech is shitty.

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We also used to threaten ou Brotkasten, as we called th C64, with a screwdriver when loading a datasette made any troubles. And look what it did.

It brought me to text-screaming at random strangers on the internet because I have unresolved issues with reality. Same effect as blowing on a cartridge.

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I watched the whole video, and there was a sum total of zero evidence presented. It’s certainly a reasonable position that blowing does nothing. It’s also a reasonable position it does. Until more evidence is presented, I’m withholding judgement.

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Atari (as well as other commercial systems of the time, like my old TRash-80) used cassettes for data I/O and expansion.

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Frogger got a pretty cool glitch if you did that. The music goes all weird and high pitched, and what looks like a safe area to jump on just might just kill you. After you’ve mastered a game regularly, you start messing with it. Believe we called it Crazy Frogger.

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Can confirm. My step-grandad had an early Polaroid camera, like we see in vintage cinema. Even with horrible, debilitating arthritis that turned his hands into twisted fists, he could operate the thing like a pro.

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Mr. Science says we need to remember to use science to try to disprove the things we think we know. Then he asserts that (he knows that) blowing the cartridges did not help. He doesn’t even provide an alternative hypothesis for why the cartridges sometimes failed and sometimes didn’t.

But if you spin the batteries in your TV remote you’ll definitely get more juice out of them right?

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I’ll admit to blowing on NES cartridges, had to remove the eraser dust after polishing the contacts. Part of the fun

Right, I guess the title was “Why Did We Blow On Nintendo Games?” and to that end they did covered logical fallacies. However, ending the video with the answer of “science” without doing any science was so unsatisfying.

The Arcadia Supercharger was third-party add-on hardware which came a few years after the 2600’s initial release. The game programs were stored on a cassette tape that you’d plug into a tape player and run a line to the big beefy cartridge (it had a big handle you could grab) which was inserted into the console’s PCB cartridge slot. I think the cartridge had some kind of memory banking scheme allowing for more program and sprite data than the allowable 2K or whatever.

I remember the game that shipped with the Supercharger, “Communist Mutants from Space” which reflected the Cold War rhetoric of those times.

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