GoFundMe. And Others


#1

Take - what - 8% of the donation? And use weasel words to avoid confessing it.

It’s a modern tragedy. And really, not necessary. People makin’ bacin’ offa donatin’.


#2

Yes, yes and yes. Businesses and foundations want to own and brand social justice work like nearly everything else.

Where are the nonprofit open source alternative networks for the social justice projects to use?

Better . . . where are the pro bono coders to work with the social justice projects making nonprofit open source alternative networks?

Sometimes in the cold grey dawn hours, I’ve wondered if some coders lack the sense of professional responsibility that other professions bake in with licensing.

“The free market will fix global warming, if that even exists.”


#3

It’s not there. They don’t have it. It’s all a bit skwey.


#4

I’m a coder, and this is what I want to do.

Did you know, you can’t kickstart a new Kickstarter? It’s in their terms of service!

But seriously, if there are people out there who want to do this kind of venture, I’m interested in talking offline.


#5

I’ve seen some.

I’ve Got A Penguin in My Briefs

FreeGeek

Hexayurt

To be fair, the notion of using FOSS and open networks for social justice problems can confuse social worky types too. A lot of us are used to the current vendor licensed, out-of-the-box-but-not-really, sell you an upgrade model.

The way to do it is probably online so that people can find each other — like Bruce Wayne sees the bat signal.


#6

Hehe. I realize that, but I’m not quite ready yet.

For now, peeps are welcome to come to me, as maybe I can become ready.


#7

Are you a coder who wants to design and implement a trusted FOSS system for receiving and routing small cash donations to nonprofits without being paid?

That sort of project needs a team . . . of social workers. :smiley_cat:


#8

I’m watching this now, from Steven Reisler: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYEuLheUrBw

It’s wonderful so far!!!


#9

There’s one! That @john_c fella

But as for where they are normally? I hesitate to ask anyone that might be a victim of the gig economy for pro bono work even on projects I’ve done where I’ve agreed or stipulated no pay for myself.

That’s a lot of professions I hesitate to ask and it’s getting worse.

Okay I’m stretching with the hesitation, I actually don’t ask anymore. If it isn’t offered, it’s paid for, traded for in-kind (except for promotion, because of all the shitbags that offer promotion if only you’ll work for them for free) or otherwise quantitatively compensated.

but if it’s offered… hell yeah I’m all over it, don’t know how many hours I’ve given away, it’s rewarding and why would I deny someone that wants the warm fuzzy of contributing.


#10

I like that guy. He speaks up. :smiley_cat:

Haven’t ever met him in person yet, but, like, he’s a hep hep swingin’ cat.

Agreed, and that work needs a special game plan.

I reserve a modest amount of time for pro bono and accept only one role with a discrete task on one well aligned collaborative project at a time.

My other work right now is social worky too so I do my part there too as much as I can manage.

Life is too short, and the rent man cometh.


#11

It is fun to organize projects.

There could be a great after school program funded by CDC rape prevention education funds engaging kids and moms in a vulnerable rural community, focusing on changing gender norms to support increased community safety.

The classes might be a hybrid One Laptop Per Child, DIY Girls and FreeGeek curriculum. Cellular networking like OLPC, STEM project-based learning like DIY Girls and recycled FOSS hardware/coding like FG.

Except for all the tech, so far, that’s a description of a real, funded 4-year project


#12

I’m a coder too, I’ve worked at financial service companies, and I think the concept being discussed is cool.

But the technology side is stupidly prehistoric, and the compliance/regulatory side will make you want to jab a pen into your temple.

Not to mention the hot breath of DHS on the back of your neck.

I’d be game to contribute, but it ain’t a normal kind of OSS project (due to money remitence)


#13

No, certainly not. I have studied the regulatory issues. Yeah. My view is, do the things needed to support groups working online, just as discussion software first. And get into the money side later on.


#14

That sounds eminently reasonable. Indirectly big finance pays my bills, but I’d love to see a platform to fund projects that isn’t so damn expensive. It benefits us all.


#15

Me too (as does the nonprof I work with). I also see this as potentially a “platform for social choice,” more generally.


#16

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