High school forces girl to wear shame suit for dress code violation


#1

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#2

I’d like to see someone make up a ‘puritan style’ dress - 100% black - turtleneck type collar and dress that goes to the floor - with a big RED 'DCV" embroidered on the front left breast area.

When life imitates fiction - the absurd is shown.


#3

Hester Prynne, we hardly knew ya. Also, sharia much?


#4

The sad part is that the story really started with whomever though having a “shame suit” was a great idea. I mean, even if we assume that the dress code is reasonable, I cannot abide any sort of disciplinary action that goes from “let’s come up with a consequence that is proportionate, makes sense, and helps the person to understand why these rules are in place” to “ah fuck it, let’s just try to single them out and make them feel like shit”.

The problem is that with reasonable rules regarding clearly unethical things like bullying, cheating, lying, stealing, etc, the consequences practically write themselves. It’s easy to discipline in these situations because the actions of the student are clearly wrong.

But when you get to ambiguous and culturally relative moral stuff all the logic goes out the window. If an administration is going to start making up things that they feel people should feel bad about, then of course they are going to come up with consequences that make no rational sense to the people that committed the alleged offenses.

Tl;dr I feel sorry for the staff that had to follow through on this.


#5

This could get interesting - or not.
The mother is considering filing a complaint with FERPA because, in her eyes, the daughter’s disciplinary record wasn’t supposed to be broadcast. But was it?

I highly doubt that FERPA would tell a P.E. teacher that he couldn’t send someone to go run a few laps if they were slacking off. Those laps would be run in front of everyone else. Even a kid being suspended is a seen action - other students will know why that student isn’t in class. So you definitely aren’t required to hide the disciplining of a student - if it’s done correctly.

I’m not saying I agree with the treatment of the student - it was really a dumb move on the part of the school. What I’m saying is that I don’t think this falls under FERPA. For that, I think they’d have to have something like a publicly-viewable photographic “wall of shame” with the girl in the outfit showing that she had been previously disciplined. That’s opening up the archive, not showing the discipline in action, and the two are very different.


#6

I can see the “Dress Code Violation” stencils on shirts and other garments becoming a fashion statement.


#7

I can’t see how this will not evolve into tons of students violating this standard and then getting to wear the shame suit as the ultimate marker of “sticking it to the man”.


#8

Just yesterday I was shopping with my aunt, and there was a t-shirt in the store that proudly proclaimed “I am a hot mess.” Neither of us was interested.

EDIT: Just found this: http://dresscodeviolation.spreadshirt.com/kids-hooded-sweatshirt-A18021258


#9

i went to a Florida school with a dress code, including the “down to the knees” provision. in fact, males sort of had it worse, in that we had to wear long slacks or jeans except on Fridays when we could wear knee-length shorts. again, this was in Florida.

fwiw, it was enforced pretty fairly; everyone hated and grumbled about it equally. to be honest, i’m in favor of dress codes for public schools.

this “shame suit” is ridiculous, if only for potential sanitary reasons, though the humiliation aspect is bad too. all we ever got were warnings and detentions. i just think that the implied “slut-shaming” connection is unwarranted.


#10

So basically, a pair of red sweatpants and an over-sized yellow T-shirt, both with the words “Dress Code Violation” stenciled in big, bold letters.

What’s to stop half the student population from going out to buy exactly that outfit and wearing it to school every day for a week?

Some school administrators might become apoplectic and die, but that would just free up oxygen for more deserving members of the human race.


#11

" … wearing a skirt that revealed her knees … "

Seriously? Did Dr Who somehow send us back to 1900?

I gotta wonder just what sort of message this sends. I mean, with a dress code like that, then the girls go to the mall or watch TV and see short-shorts, miniskirts, etc, this must confuse the hell out of them.

I also have to wonder if that same dress code applies to the teachers and administration.


#12

I guess they ‘made’ her wear it by threatening to expel her or make a mark on her (dun dun dun) PERMANENT RECORD.

Is there any logical, reasonable way out of this when the ‘adults’ you are appealing to are the unreasonable bullies who are forcing you into the situation?

Is it reasonable to fake a coughing fit and ask to go home? Every time someone starts talking to you; “Bleaueargh-ough-coughcough!!!”


#13

it’s not a boarding school or a convent, ffs. the rest of the day and on weekends, they can wear whatever they otherwise would.

and, yes, at my school and in every case i know of, the staff and faculty were bound by the same dress code, if not stricter.


#14

this was an eye-opener when I moved down south. in Michigan, we could wear shorts to school if we wanted, but of course there was only a few weeks of the school year when it was comfortable to do so. I move to Nashville in 7th grade, and it’s hot all the time with humidity like I’d never encountered before, but no shorts allowed, not even a “casual friday” reprieve.

of course, now, I’m used to the weather and pretty much only wear pants. plus, I think shorts on grown men looks trashy, but I seem to be the minority view.

EDIT: as I was posting, I remembered a local news item from back then about some high-school boys who wore skirts (dress-code legal and weather-appropriate) to school in protest of the pants-only requirement. I remember being all “right on!” but I did not join them in solidarity, I didn’t have the balls to wear a skirt in public back then. my “wild clothing” days were a few years ahead.


#15

My new trademark on the “Dress Code Violation” clothing line.


#16

In my experience such a protest will only occur if the girl is popular and well-liked by most of the students. Maybe–I’d even say hopefully–teenagers have changed since I was in school, but I remember popular students being treated as though their punishments–even the legitimate ones–were a badge of honor. If an unpopular student was punished, though, other kids enjoyed seeing “the man” stick it to a kid they didn’t like.


#17

Makes us two. Horrid view and simply unable to dress correctly. However, it’s their right to dress so - or should be. I keep forgetting that Americans hate their government telling them to do thing and then urn around to invent much more repressive rules in a smaller environment.


#18

shorts do look trashy but goddam they feel nice. you can split the difference and wear linen pants though. :slight_smile:


#19

That was FAST.

What about selling lasercut stencils for DIYers? With DXF (or SVG, or anything vector that can be converted) files to download for those with access to their own laser (or exacto knife and patience)?


#20

Out of curiosity, where did you go to high school? I went to Overton, and, starting my sophomore year, there were a couple of days when we were allowed to wear shorts.

Even more popular was the student-organized “opposite day”. A few boys were sent home for wearing dresses.