James Clapper: Snowden accelerated crypto adoption by 7 years


#1

[Read the post]


#2

…So that’s four years, not seven.


#3

GOOD
stupid post must be 6 characters


#4

yes 


#5

Eric Clapper has so perfectly revealed the banality of the evil he represents, and so perfectly identified himself as being a true believer therein, that I can now safely predict that anything he considers good is, in fact, bad.


#6

We play that game at work, When in doubt blame Snowden.


#7

“Build all your strategies around the idea that your enemy is an incompetent, for fighting a competent enemy is hard.” - Sun Tzu


#8

Dog years.


#9

Exactly.


#10

Yes, yes, but the question is how much has crypto been accelerated by Clapper’s perjury?

I propose that all future references to “Snowden” be replaced with the term “Clapper’s perjury”:
Clapper’s perjury accelerated crypto adoption by 7 years
US Government admits it went after Lavabit looking for Clapper’s perjury
The post-Clapper-perjury digital divide: the ability to understand and use privacy tools


#11

A mere <3 is inadequate to express my appreciation for the idea you propose :thumbsup:


#12

@cntrfldr For that matter, I still have no idea how much crypto has been accelerated by Snowden’s whistleblowing, either. The Clapper leaves the actual GOAL which has supposedly been reached 7 years early as an undefined variable. This makes The Clapper’s complaint meaningless.

Consider: maybe NSA predicted a big change. Maybe they predicted a small change. The Clapper’s not saying.

Did NSA predict that 95% of American businesses would finally use good encryption routinely in 7 years? That would be worthy of consideration. Or was the prediction just a 5% increase? That would actually be good news for spies, but The Clapper’s wrapped it up and made it sound scary.

What is clear is that The Clapper is a hysterical clown, and no reasonable person can believe anything he says. If someone shot him in the chest, it would be wise to be skeptical even of the sucking sound coming from the wound.


#13

Yup. I’m going for a <5.


#14

Huh…i’m quite surprised they allow old man clapper to air his crazy views from his jail cell after he perjured himself in front of congress. That happened, right? I’m suffering from a head cold so a bit confused. :confused:


#15

High court / low court.

Clapper, Wall Street, Comcast - and Yoo, Gonzales, Cheney and other at the heart of turning the US into a torture state - get the high court. The low court - where there are actual penalties - is for the little people.

The little people are also barred from buying services internationally. Netflix from other countries, real but grey market goods (imported from countries where they’re sold for less) etc. Those at the top can off-shore their workforce and profits.

Hope This Helps!


#16

I’m trying to recover here!


#17

It’s funny to hear this, because I feel crypto-algo development has been seemingly frozen in time since the time of AES some eighteen years ago, unless elliptical curve Diffie-Hellman key exchange should count.

The issue isn’t encryption, it’s trust.


#18

Mere facts and math can’t stand in the way of Supreme Righteousmobile


#19

Always has been and that’s why crypto is"hard"


#20

"Given that Mr Clapper’s job is, in part, to help Americans keep their data safe"
Yeeeeahh, I’m pretty sure that isn’t any part of his job. In fact, I’d imagine it amounts to pretty much the opposite. It sounds like it’s all about data collection, not data protection. Having data be as insecure as possible just makes his job easier, no matter what sorts of problems it creates.