Johnny Cash portrait by Drew Friedman


#1

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#2

The unframed prints are issued on heavyweight (310g) mould-made
William Turner stock, a natural white, 100% rag paper with a fine
toothy surface manufactured by Hahnemühle (est. 1584), who are
renowned for premium-grade archival papers. Our editions are produced
on an Epson 3800Pro large format printer using Epson UltraChrome K3
Pigment Ink Technology, resulting in brilliant, velvety color and
offering excellent longevity and durability.

Giclee Prints = Fail. The fact that anybody can charge $175 for something that is SCANNED and inject printed blows my mind. Then to call it a fine art print is beyond dishonest. Screenprint / Litho / letterpress or GTFO.


#3

I've found Drew Friedman's portraits to be clunky and unflattering to his subjects. Of course, exaggeration of a subject's more prominent features is a hallmark of any caricturist - but Friedman rarely seems to have complete control of what he's doing. It also seems that when he runs out of graphic ideas, he expands the subject's nose and face into the forefront of the composition (think fish-eye lens) - However, this Johnny Cash drawing is rather nice and understated...and balanced color and line-wise.


#4

According to this website litho doesn't reproduce color as well as giclee among other issues. If you're going to vociferously disparage someone's offering like this, how about you back yourself up as to why?

http://finerworks.com/info/giclee-vs-lithograph-prints.aspx


#7

It is kind of lame that Giclee is a synonym for "was printed on some kind of inkjet printer with no particular guarantee of quality or durability whatsoever".

He wanted a name for the new type of prints they were producing on the IRIS printer, a large-format, high-resolution industrial prepress proofing inkjet printer they had adapted for fine-art printing. He was specifically looking for a word that would not have the negative connotations of "inkjet" or "computer generated". It is based on the French word gicleur, which means "nozzle" (the verb form gicler means "to squirt, spurt, or spray,").[4] One unintended consequence of Duganne's choice of name was its problematic use in the French language since it is also modern French slang for male ejaculation


#8

It is kind of lame that Giclee is a synonym for "was printed on some kind of inkjet printer with no particular guarantee of quality or durability whatsoever".

You could say the same of most other processes and products. It often depends upon the particular producer and/or manufacturer. But, I'm not sure I get what your point is.


#9

Saying "Giclee!" isn't enough. They need to specify exactly what kind of process was used and what we're paying $175 for.

Because if I can drive to Office Depot and recreate their "fine art print" with a $99 inkjet printer, then that's kind of a rip-off, isn't it?


#10

You can't go to Office Depot and print one that has been approved by the artist and signed/numbered by her/him. I agree with you that print quality is very important but I think you're missing the point of what you're buying when you buy a limited-edition art print.


#11

Saying "Giclee!" isn't enough. They need to specify exactly what kind of process was used and what we're paying $175 for.

Dude, get a grip. It's not a rip-off. How would you like it if someone starts talking shit on your vastly expensive (maybe overpriced?) keyboards you're trying to hawk?

http://drewfriedman.net/print.html

DREW FRIEDMAN fine art prints are produced by digital media specialist/archivist Barbara Economon with state-of-the-art technology. Prints are meticulously crafted and painstakingly replicated from high-resolution scans of the the original art. All elements of the artist's work are retained.

The unframed prints are issued on heavyweight (310g) mould-made William Turner stock, a natural white, 100% rag paper with a fine toothy surface manufactured by Hahnemühle (est. 1584), who are renowned for premium-grade archival papers. Our editions are produced on an Epson 3800Pro large format printer using Epson UltraChrome K3 Pigment Ink Technology, resulting in brilliant, velvety color and offering excellent longevity and durability.

All prints are issued on untrimmed sheets, with at least a one-inch border on all sides to allow for proper matting. Each edition print is personally approved and hand-signed (and, where applicable, -titled) by the artist. Edition numbers are handwritten and usually applied by the printmaker. New works are launched with the lowest edition number (e.g., 1/25), with subsequent numbers sold in sequence; the highest number (e.g., 25/25) is sold last.

Due to the fine art print's higher-resolution process, as well as superior paper, inks, and quality control, the colors in the print appear brighter, crisper, and more vibrant than the online image. Online color appearance may vary slightly depending on your monitor settings.

Jeez christ.....


#14

As stated that's basically a $400 inkjet printer. I guess I'd feel better about it if it was a super high end exotic printer, or a print that required some kind of actual craftsmanship other than driving to the store, buying a certain model of inkjet printer, installing an inkjet cartridge, and pressing the print button.

Still, it is a signed print, and signed things have value, I suppose.


#15

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