Justice Department to drop 'FBI vs. Apple' case, because they've unlocked the iPhone


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Next up: FBI vs. That Dude Over There with Two Hands, a Flashlight and a Map


#3

I don’t necessarily believe them. The case, along with public opinion, didn’t seem to be going in their direction. Public opinion was only going to go more toward Apple, once people learned that this was really about whether functional encryption systems are allowed to be a publicly-available technology as we move deeper into the 21st Century. Most people realize, with hackers now being a major global problem, that encryption is, indeed, necessary for society to continue to function.

Now, there is no precedent set. They can sit back, and wait for the next time to throw a hissy fit about encryption, like they did with Clipper back in the 90s.


#4

I see no reason not to believe them, that they’ve decrypted the device.

My conspiracy theory skews the other way: That they had the capability all along.


#5

I’m not sure “they” as in FBI had the capability. Who knows about the… other folks. Who for all we now, are the ones who got the hack to FBI, and this other company is a cover story entirely.


#6

It sounds like time to press charges against the FBI for illegally accessing a computer system.


#7

You don’t suppose they just went for it and lost all the data and are saying, “uh…yeah, we figured out how to get in, so we don’t need your help now.” :sweat:


#8

So, if we are to believe them, the FBI used a 0 day exploit to crack open the phone? And so the FBI will now tell them exactly how they did this so that Apple can fix the bug in the phone.

Ha! That’s a nice joke.


#9

I am sure they farmed out the work to a contractor. Companies like Mitre employ such people specifically for contract work for various agencies. It’s quite rare that they direct hire that kind of talent (for whatever reason).


#10

FBI went up against an adversary too well funded and prepared to defend itself. Expect them to try the legal gambit further down the road with a company they can roll over more easily. (Sprinkle with 2 liberal dashes of OMG Terrorists! for best results.)


#11

At the very least, shouldn’t any dick pics be released with a FOIA request?


#12

“We will continue to pursue all available options for this mission”

And if that mission were the only thing that mattered then that might be the right thing to do, but it’s not the only thing that matters. Just say no to single-issue solutions.

Also, nice job FBI shutting down an important part of the public debate before it reached a conclusion the FBI didn’t like. /sarc


#13

The phone is owned by San Bernardino County, who gave the FBI permission to access the phone. That makes the access authorized, and legal.


#14

Parallel Construction: (noun) for future domestic law enforcement cases, the method by which evidence obtained via a classified iPhone hack enters the criminal justice system.


#15

I think you’re right; they were just looking to set precedent, and now that it looks like the FBI won’t be able to, they are desperately trying to back pedal to avoid what they probably consider the worst case.

WTF is with this steady erosion of US citizens’ rights, anyways? its never that effective to erode the fundamentals anyways, and is in fact quite dangerous.


#16

Maybe they did some police work and found the post-it with a number on it that was craftily placed under the desk?


#17

You and Wes Clark. He said weeks ago that the case was about precedent.


#18

Getting drawn into religious extremism of any kind is fucking stupid.


#19

Mr.44, you want to see that guys dick pics?


#20

Or under the phones case.