Kraut makers delight! A $9 cabbage shredder


#1

[Read the post]


#2

#3

Dude, Ron Popeil. The maker’s maker.


#4

#5

Boy, I’m just not seeing the benefit. If that device is sharp enough to shred cabbage with minimal effort, it’s as sharp as a knife has to be to accomplish the same. They’ll both get close to your fingers as you work.

If you’re feeling unsafe around your kitchen knives, maybe they are actually less sharp than they need to be, and therefore you’re having to put more force into cutting things than you ought? A well-honed knife is effortless to use for nearly any kitchen cutting task.


#6

seeing the head line I expected something more impressive, not a rather normal-looking peeler


#7

Seems like a slicer like this would give you much more consistently-sized shreds than a knife would, helpful when making pickles.


#8

I can see a benefit, but it wouldn’t apply to everyone. I have trouble with my right wrist, going on about 20 years, but it’s not too bad anymore and I get by fine. What hurts is prolonged use, like shredding a whole head of cabbage. I can’t use my knife left-handed, but I can use a vegetable peeler with either hand. This looks like an enormous peeler, and I think I could switch between hands so I don’t have to stop partway through. Now, if this was $29, I might not find it worth the price, but under $10? Yeah, I think I’ll get one.


#9

I’ve been using a mandoline to shred my cabbage, but I’d be interested to see what kinds of shreds/pieces this tool makes. Any photos?


#10

That’s not a Kraut cutter…
[walks out of room; grunting and sound of wood dragging across floor]
Now, THIS is a Kraut cutter!


#11

I dunno, I made a batch of marmalade a while ago using only a chef’s knife to slice and seed a dozen lemons. The slices weren’t machine-perfect or anything, but they were pretty consistent. And when I make slaw, I just use a chef’s knife to shred the cabbage.

Again, I think the sharpness of the knife has a lot to do with how accurately you can use it. When I’ve had trouble controlling how things were cut up, it’s frequently been because the knife isn’t sharp enough.


#12

I was using the mandolin too, its harder to clean and more likely to eat a finger.


#13

I can’t remember, did I post this pic? Marmalade makins’ cut with a pen knife. Took forever.


#14

That’s not what a marmalade cat looks like. Ur doing it rong.


#15

This is the ‘before’ pic.


#16

I have a mandolin also, but I won’t go near it without a cutting glove or two.

Last time I got brave, I ended up passing out from the pain of removing a patch of skin from my fingertip. It was only 1/4 x 1/8 inch but I’m still glad I wasn’t home alone when I did it. My dude caught me, which I am grateful for, because otherwise I might have also cracked my head open.


#17

I’ve lost more chunks of finger to my mandoline slicer than any knife I own.


#18

I was considering blogging the cutting gloves I got for mine, but I’m still scared of it.


#19

Brilliant. Truly ideal. Especially if placed in the back of a buckboard wagon, with an enormous bag of salt, empty crocks or wooden barrels, as it slowly travels row by row in the cabbage field. Hand me that jug of switchel, this shredding is thirsty work!

How many Amish have missing fingers or parts of fingers because of kraut-making?


#20

What kind of mandolines are you people using that don’t have the grippy knob hand protector thingers? E.g.: