Lockpicking lawyer meets a "Pickproof" lock

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Oh, you probably meant Venice, CA.

Also, @robertmckenna, did you just out yourself as a bicycle fence?

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Why bother with an advanced AI?

Land mines are tamper-resistant enough that people who prefer their digits as-is usually prefer in-situ destruction by one means or another over attempting to defuse them; and a great many of those don’t even have electronic parts.

Lockpicking lawyer meets a “Pickproof” lock

disappointed krysten ritter GIF

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Kryptonite denied there was a problem for a very long time. A lot of people had their bikes stolen with the Bic pen technique. I freaked my students out when I taught picking as part of a locksmithing course. I would pick up the round bodied Bic that I’d taken attendance with (not the octagonal type), pull the guts out and pick a massive Kryptonite U-lock in about 5 seconds. It always blew their minds and showed them that lock picking is a skill anyone can learn and master.
Any lock that you can’t bump or otherwise easily defeat will usually protect your property. The problem with high end bikes is that the components are worth so much that a hacksaw is sometimes used to cut through the spiffy carbon fibre frame and take the bike away to be stripped and the parts sold on Craigslist or ebay for more than they could get for the whole bike, and with a lot less chance of being caught.

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As others have said, most bike thieves aren’t picking locks, so it really shouldn’t be that much of a concern.

Personally, I don’t find brute-force entry that much of a concern either, I guess because I ride cheap bikes.

Last winter, my bike lock froze, and I stupidly tried to force the key to turn in the lock:

Fortunately, a quick trip to the hardware store had a very easy solution:

The lock was unhardened, so a two-foot bolt cutter went through it like soft butter.

And so the next day I went out and bought… the very same lock. I figured, hey, I now own the bolt cutters. It’s like a universal skeleton key to my lock.

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Liked for the Gif.

Catching up on classic cinema has been my one good practice during this last, long year

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LPL does use a Kryptonite but not a D-lock, he uses a chain lock ([868] Why I Use This Lock On My Bicycle - Kryptonite Evolution Chain Lock (Series 4)

Based on that video, I bought the same lock for both my bikes after a thieve cut through a Kryptonite Evolution D-lock like butter in the streets of Central London.

The 90cm version is about 2.5kg, which is 1kg more than a D-lock + steel cable but I’ve learnt the lesson and I rather carry an extra kilo than lose another bike.

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Good luck.

Personally, I opt for the Abus Granite X series. The shorter, the safer. But there are tradeoffs, of course, and no lock is safe.

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Here:

SAF-lock-in-hands-cb3ad45

Now stop whining.

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This is strong logic. When I went to college I put together a beater bike to use for riding between my apartment and the campus. Did a grody spray paint job on the frame, and built it up from decent used parts - none from the same product line. I also built a handmade cable lock from heavy braided cable. The cable clamp hardware was covered with epoxy painted with metallic spray paint. The whole thing shouted “junkyard”, but it was a quite decent bike and lasted through all four years.

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