Map of Europe shows the lights coming on and going off, 1993-2003


#1

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#2

#3

So, we have a composite image purportedly produced by NOAA, but the hi-res image itself (at least from sciencephoto.com) is behind a registration/login wall, complete with a licence fee for uses other than “layouts”? I thought stuff produced by the US government was public domain (or the layman’s equivalent thereof). What am I missing?


#4

What happened in Eire during that period? Was there a massive programme of rural streetlighting, or something?


#5

The “Celtic Tiger” era, but I think the lights are due to the build out of EU subsidized roads and highways throughout the countryside replacing the “boreens” (cow paths). For “highway” though think two lane divided roads not American superhighways. Still an improvement over single lane roads with no shoulder lined with stone walls and hedges only wide enough for 1 subcompact car at a time.


#6

Conversely, what happened in the dark blue strip along the Black Sea and a bit north?


#7

Russian Invaders?


#8

Although the colors are not as lurid, the global NOAA DMSP dataset for 1992, 2000, & 2008 is at full resolution here: http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=100

There is also a two year composite (1992 & 2009) here: http://sos.noaa.gov/Datasets/dataset.php?id=101

Strange to see lights over a big chunk of western Canada disappear. A lot of people moving to the cities it seems.


#9

probably nothing. but public domain allows everyone to use the work for everything, including selling it - and the site does not claim an own copyright (though the image processing could be a derivative work with a new copyright)


#10

Too early for those. It’s just the post-Soviet collapse of industries that only made sense in an isolationist controlled economy but couldn’t compete in an international free market, and the collateral results of the general upheaval surrounding it.


#11

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