Massive steel labyrinth


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Sorry, that’s not technically a labyrinth, that’s a maze. A labyrinth has a single through-route with twists and turns but without branches. A maze is a confusing pathway that has many branches, choices of path and dead-ends. http://www.diffen.com/difference/Labyrinth_vs_Maze


#3

And in the center, there are Cenobites. “Ahh yes - we have been waiting.”


#4

Technically, the piece is called “The Labyrinth” named from the greek myth and is considered a maze. If you had maybe read the accompanying link you would have realized this.


#5

I want to go to there.

Seriously, that’s awesome.


#6

Thank you. Yes, I see. I’m just a stickler, especially when it comes to mazes being called labyrinths generically. So this maze is called “Labyrinth” which confuses the issue even further. Thanks for pointing it out. I should have read the article.


#7

All good. David should have named the piece “Massive Steel Maze” originally for sure.


#8

From the much-more in-depth Wikipedia article cited by your article, the word “Labyrinth” comes specifically from the one built by Daedalus, and that that labyrinth most likely was understood to have branching paths:

the unicursal seven-course “Classical” design became associated with the Labyrinth on coins as early as 430 BC, and became widely used to represent the Labyrinth – even though both logic and literary descriptions make it clear that the Minotaur was trapped in a complex branching maze.

The OED includes the definition

Labyrinth: A structure consisting of a number of intercommunicating passages arranged in bewildering complexity, through which it is difficult or impossible to find one’s way without guidance; a maze.

Encyclopedia Brittanica:

Labyrinth, also called maze, system of intricate passageways and blind alleys.

It’s clear that “Labyrinth” has two valid uses: (1) a maze, (2) when distinguishing it from other mazes, a maze with only one path.

(Expect the same response if you tell us we shouldn’t refer to a car’s velocity.)


#9

I don’t think anyone was confused. It’s a thing you can get lost in.


#10

In other words, English is not akin to Fortran.


#11

Maybe the Minotaur was just easily disoriented. Don’t judge, you’d be disoriented too if you had livestock for a head.


#12

Too bullheaded to ask for directions


#13

From the overhead shot, it looks cute. From the ground… let’s just say, you would find me in there months from now, begging for food and water.


#14

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