Pinky and the Brain's greatest tongue-twister of all time




That was the most potty mouthed cartoon dialog I've ever tried and failed to recite.


I'd give both ovaries to hear the out-take recordings of that episode.


I'm proud my native state of New Jersey has given the world so many funny names. Not just Hackensack & Secaucus, but also Hohokus, Wehauken, Cheesequake, Hopatcong, Manhawkin ... the list goes on.

Thanks are due mostly to the Lenape people who gave us so many of these wonderful words.


Mouth agape. Wow.


Somehow, I think there must've been some mystified parents wondering where the children picked up the habit of saying the sheet slitters TT in error, and so fast. Pseudolus is smiling somewhere.


Come now. Golden-era Looney Tunes were obviously the high-water mark in kids' animation. Animaniacs is of fine quality, but its' script sacrificed resonance for self awareness too frequently.
The 'Tunes' balanced such matters, and as such had better composition.
Post-Script -- What do I know, anyway?!
--- Lovingly, A Maroon.


Dialogue from TV series "Pinky and the Brain" season 1, episode 48, entitled "You Said a Mouseful", originally aired 14 November 1997, written by Gordon Bressack.
According to Wikipedia List_of_Pinky_and_the_Brain_episodes this was Season 3, episode 48, not season 1.


KS: I am honoured by your visit. Let me show you our assembly line.
First, sheets of sheer synthetic sheepskin are slit into several
Kicky-Sack shoe shapes in shapely shoe sizes by six sitting sheet slitters.

B: I only see five sitting sheet slitters.

KS: The sixth sitting sheet slitter's sick. His son Sammy's subbing 'til the sick sixth sitting sheet slitter's back, sitting pretty.

P: You're not the sheet slitter?

S: No, I'm the sheet slitter's son.

P: Well.... You keep on slitting sheets until the sheet slitter comes.
Haheheheh! Whooohaaah.

[View of a machine labelled "Sheet Slitter Shoe Shaper".]

KS: The Shoe Shaper then shapes the slit synthetic sheepskin sheets, and shoots out shoes through the chute.

KS: Now, this is Mr. Plunkett, the new khaki sock plucker. (I had to fire our previous sock plucker. He had a bit of an attitude.)

B: So, you sacked the cocky khaki Kicky-Sack sock plucker?

KS: The second cocky khaki Kicky-Sack sock plucker I sacked since the sixth sitting sheet slitter got sick.

[Lights dim. Machine whirs and slows down.]

KS: Whoops! Don't worry; just an electrical problem. One of the Kicky-Sack sack pickers will have to flick the plug.

P: Not the khaki sock plucker?

KS: Oh, my, no! The Kicky-Sack sack pickers flick the plug. The khaki sock plucker can't reach the socket over the latex child perambulator fenders we use to line the treadmill.

B: It might make more sense to have the sixth sitting sheet slitter's son flick the plug, if the sack pickers and the sock pluckers are behind the rubber baby buggy bumpers.

[Sammy flicks the plug. Everything whirs back up.]

KS: I never thought of that!

B: Of course, you didn't.


Here the linked Youtube video obviously skips some part.


Now, Pinky, here is the plan. Remember, every step must be performed with precision!

You must slit the sixth sick sheet slitter's son's sheet, secure it next to the toy boat from the Hackensack Socko Kicky-Sack Sack Kickers' picnic in Secaucus, stretch it past the sack pickers' station and the sock plucker's chute, and pick a sack, pluck a sock, and flick the plug, so I can put the pea in the plucked sock with the picked sack for ballast and bounce it off the rubber baby buggy bumper, into the Parker Packard purple pewter pressure pump. Is that understood?

I have found the complate text transcript here:


The best Pinky and the Brain episode is of course "Yes, Always". An almost word-for-word copy of Orson Welles being a prick while recording a commercial voiceover.


I do not want your ovaries, but here you go:
Start listening at 20:45


Here is the Reddit discussion on the topic:


Oh, Yeah?

Try Waukesha, Manastee, Wauwautosa, Waupun, Sheboygan, Kewaskum, Oconomowac, Menasha, Oconto, Pesuakee, and Memonmenee


Fetch me my Spear annnd maaagiiic HEEEEEEELMMMMEEEEE-EEEET!
They don't make 'em like they used to...


I was fortunate enough to work at WB TV Animation at the time as an assistant editor, and worked on Pinky and the Brain, Animaniacs, Freakazoid!, and (erm) The Sylvester and Tweety Mysteries. I'm still in the animation business, but I've never had a better job, nor do I expect to. The company was staffed with amazingly good people (except for one [higher-up but I'm not naming names] guy who screamed and belittled people all the time, and who hasn't worked a lot since, thankfully), was really progressive (oh, the seminars they held on sexual/workplace harassment!), and as stated previously, the best gig I've ever had. And while all of the output from those years might not be as great as the classic Looney Tunes (or Popeye or Tex Avery), it was miles beyond anything else any other studio was doing at the time. (Kricfalusi excluded, but I think we can all agree he was kinda sui generis.)

There's still great cartoons being made (see Adventure Time or Regular Show), but those last great WB days will always be special to me. Added bonus...? It was run so well that being a slack mofo was par for the course. Then came that hateful word, "productivity"'s never been the same since.


Hello fellow Wisconsinite. Although now I'm an expat in MN.


Are you sure about that? I see some misspellings there. . . smile


Surely the start of this slick skit is the twister that I heard as a kid is the hardest in English to say three times fast. Here's another claim that it is indeed:

"The Sixth sick sheik's sixth sheep's sick" has the Guiness World Record for toughest tongue twister.


I wonder if it's as tongue-twisting in the Mandarin translation? I remember being impressed that the Chinese translation of Seuss's Fox in Sox was as hard in both languages while still being about the same pictures in each.


Were they going for Menomonie? And how could they leave out Pewaukee?


I've always been partial to "Unique New York"