Pirates are the best customers: just sell good stuff at a reasonable price in a timely fashion

I thought the Cassette Menace struck in the 60s, and music’s last gasp was the defiant C-30 C-60 C-90 Go. (Caution - extreme eighties.)

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Well, the reality is that music had been on it’s last legs since human beings started remembering songs and singing them to one another later without explicit permission from the original author (within 70 years of the death of that author, anyway).

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All of that represents demand. It’s painfully obvious.

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What I always thought was strange as a teenager, growing up in the 90s, was how Best Buy and other stores made a big splash with “Almost every CD is $10!” and then how, by the end of the decade, all CDs were up to $18. And then all the big music labels were sued for collusion, and lost:

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/music/news/2002-09-30-cd-settlement_x.htm

and I got a nice check in the mail for about $15, or the price of a CD.

It’s little wonder that after price collusion by the industry as a whole that Napster and other distribution networks took off with such a bang.

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All right. Could you address my point instead of arguing etymology?

It is convenient for both the oh so severely damaged rights holders and the activists to use crazy language like “piracy” to describe copying data. This has all become one of those who gets to hold the gun arguments, not really one about banning guns.

Actually, I agree with the rest of it. But don’t obfuscate with words like etymology - the words we choose can frame a debate so powerfully one side can’t even be heard. For example, who but a monster could be pro-piracy?

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Ignore the troll.

Digital products have distribution costs almost indistinguishable from $0.

Old models based on cost per unit are obsolete.

Troll won’t understand no matter how clearly you explain it.

I agree entirely that vocabulary can be used to frame and reframe a debate, but self-declared software pirates have been gleefully embracing the term for decades. If I want to pirate a game (because I’m currently unemployed and broke), where do I go? The Pirate Bay. It’s a little late to claim that only industry shills use the word.

In fact, at this point, “piracy” is the word that supporters use. It’s seen as romantic and rebellious. Opponents have moved on to words like “thief” and “steal”.

This seemed reasonably clear to me–look at Cory’s title for the post. So it’s frustrating that, judging by upvotes, nobody actually read either one of our posts, they just hearted the one that looked like it superficially supported their opinion.

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See, this is what I mean. In your mind, a person who loses their livelihood isn’t a regrettable victim of a changing world, they’re somehow simultaneously an asshole who deserves bad things, and also lying about it anyway. That’s stupid.

I’m not talking about creation, but distribution.

Record companies never created music.

The person you just called a “troll” has said in this thread that his business failed due to pirates. I don’t know exactly what business he was in, but I haven’t heard of any major record labels that have failed and blamed pirates, so we can probably rule that out.

Are you saying he’s a liar, or a deserving asshole, or both? On what grounds?

How does this person know that their business failed due to pirates?

I regret throwing the T-word around so loosely regardless

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