The U.S. Navy now has an unmanned drone warship. Could it be hacked at sea?

The thing that should not be forgotten is that this is a test for crewless commercial ships. Considering that most of the profit in modern piracy is from kidnapping, it could get even more interesting in a decade or two as fleet owners jump on this.

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We shall see/

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Something like:

Few of these would make more sense:

Of course it would have to have robots maintaining the UAVs.

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hmmm…lets read the few paragraphs that you quoted from the source…

looks like the answer is right there if one reads the words. Not remote controllable. Not armed. The “concerned people” must not be readers. So it seems highly unlikely. Not to mention that they will likely be monitored by satellite 24/7.


The anwser is: NO

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But some are concerned [weasel words] that with no humans at the controls…

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I’m sure President Trump will not have these weaponised and let lose along the coast of Mexico to enforce a no-float zone.

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They might have avoided this for PR reasons; but the traditional anti-tamper solution involves a variety of sensors that are tricky to get by without triggering and enough explosives to ruin your day if you do trigger them.

(Since the software and possibly some of the hardware for this is, presumably, something we don’t want appearing in a Chinese clone 6 months from now; I’d assume that there is going to be some sort of intrusion detection. It’s just not clear whether that means ‘intruder alert: zeroize key storage!’ or something a bit more dramatic.)

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I’m sure it’s unhackable*

*according to the contractor who sold it

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The U.S. automotive industry has been metric since around 1990, with the exception of the instrumentation (mph vs kmh, etc.) But if you need to wrench on your non-vintage car, all the fasteners are metric.

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Some recent military technology has proven to be completely unhackable.

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While people routinely cross oceans in boats made largely of plastic or wood, it’s hard to make a propulsion system without metal.

(Yes, you can have a sailing vessel with wooden spars, but what’s going to haul on the lines?).

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“SEA HUNTER”

Very snappy, indeed.

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I imagine not, as governments (and everyone else who travels by sea or uses things that were shipped by sea) have an interest in people not “salvaging” unmanned lightships.

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I would have gone with “Shooty in the McBoatyface”.

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To be clear, one tech who wasn’t there blamed Windows. And his other claims - like the ship being “dead in the water” and having to be towed - were wrong.

Scientific American had a different story: It was the battle management software that was knocked out by a divide-by-zero error, and the result would have been the same regardless of what OS it ran on.

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“Shoot McB” for short.

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Do ceramics count? Depending on what sort of detectors you are trying to evade, they may not be any better than metal; but the fancy ones can replace metals in quite a few areas, if your wallet can stand it.

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Wait a minute, what if this is just an elaborate ruse like “The Mechanical Turk”, and there is actually a crew inside sailing it?

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Given the number of years we’ve been using various unattended naval infrastructure(undersea telegraph lines are ancient, as are floating navigational markers of various sorts, mines and research drones more recent) I’d have to imagine that the matter has largely been settled in favor of the ‘if we meant to have it sitting there and/or wandering around; the fact that it doesn’t have a crew is irrelevant.’ position.

In general, I’d imagine that(at least in practice if not in writing) ‘salvage’ isn’t what it used to be just because communications and tracking are so much better. Like most law, the rules regarding salvage were tacked together to deal with a circumstance that otherwise would have remained ambiguous: “so this ship/wreck/crate just washed up and nobody knows who owns it. What process should we use to avoid having useful stuff rotting in limbo forever without encouraging piracy-in-the-guise-of-salvage?”

Back in the day, when ships didn’t have transponders, goods weren’t uniquely serialized at the factory, communications were on a ‘letter sent with next ship’ basis and so on, there was a lot of room for genuinely mysterious stuff, or stuff with no realistic prospect of finding the owner and returning it for a cost low enough to be worth it. Now, there is still room for mystery(especially when a ship is trying to avoid scrutiny, though you may not want the cargo some of those carry…); but a great many formerly mysterious vessels and containers can now likely be tracked down with a few phone calls, which gives the authorities less reason to look charitably on the claim that it’s time for finders keepers.

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The answer to the question in the headline is no, but that’s because I suspect it’ll be hacked well before it gets out to sea.

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