This 13-hour documentary about WWII ships and battles in WWII will put you to sleep


#21

Funny, I thought Das Boot was meant to dissuade men from becoming submariners. I sure as hell didn’t want anything to do with it, and doubly so after getting hit by a passing ship’s wake at exactly the point in the Pampanito’s audio tour where you get depth charged.


#22

Oh to just shake Peterson’s hand !

The first time I saw Das Boot, (yeah ‘another’ Sub movie), while in H.S., it was terrifying !

After renting it a few times though, I realized I was hooked*.

Maturity has since set in … They were the enemy (who had torpedoed relatives of mine) but… We’re all brothers… !!

IMHO: One of the most realistic movies ever made.

*Can lip-sync it so well that I’ve won numerous drinks at trivia bars . .:slight_smile:


#23

Whereas we know it was the Americans who did that.


#24

FTFY. 


#25

There was a heavy British emphasis to the subjects of the episodes. I don’t think there was more than 6 or 7 (out of 26) episodes out of the series to cover both the Pacific War and Eastern Front.

Out of the series, they had one episode apiece for the home fronts of the British, German and Japanese. Those were usually snooze fests. A lot of 1970’s talking head interviews, very little 'splosions.

It is still one of the all time best documentary series about World War II along with Victory at Sea. The standard all others aspire to.


#26

America still owes Canada beer for representing North America against the Nazis from 1939-41. Good job!


#27

Oh yes!
Btw the same poem was read by Burt Lancaster in The Unknown War (a series with great footage, but narration is undermined by Soviet Union approved writing)


#28

I recently saw the full 5 hour version of it (over the course of a week in an episodic fashion). Worth watching once to say you saw it.

It still worked best as a film in a single viewing in the original 2.5 hour version.


#29

American beer?

Pass.


#30

Well that’s me. I like talking head inteviews. I mean, they spoke to Doenitz about submarine warfare! Doenitz!

That was a once in a lifetime interview.


#31

Actual research? No military marches? Color film?! Clearly this is commie propaganda by libtard doo-gooders who want to see their country raped by inferior foreigners!!!11111 Thank GOD the good folks of the Youtube comment section warned me!


#32

How long after separation until you stopped glowing?

As a kid, Navy was very appealing, and you Chicken of the Sea guys seemed to have the safest duty (all things considered)…but the thought of being aboard during an actual launch – and what to do after – was just too depressing. Thank you for putting up with what I couldn’t have borne.


#33

Though a lot of people think Rogers wrote the score, he actually contributed the twelve primary themes. Robert Russell Bennett turned them into the soundtrack. Bennett was a longtime collaborator with Rogers, primarily as a trusted an innovative orchestrator for his musicals, and since there are only a few pages of sheet music for Victory At Sea among Rogers’ papers, it seems to be accepted that Bennett provided the vast majority of the almost 12 hours of music.


#34

Thank you for bringing him up.

Actually I did know that. Bennett was involved with a lot of important music in a similar way. Richard Rogers was kind of a lazy person in some ways. I just didn’t want to water-down my larger point about The World at War.


#35

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