Tim Berners-Lee calls for Web "Magna Carta" - does the "Web we want" have DRM in it?


#1

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#2

My dear little netizens,
It is not about what you want -- it is about what we need and WE need DRM.
Sincerely,
RIAA, et al


#3

It would also worsen accessibility problems, wouldn't it?


#4

If only there was a 'plugin' of some kind that could do this...


#5

No do DRM. The justification is given that it protects high value content but the truth is that it completly fails to do that. Observe how netflix exclusive shows appear on torrent sites minutes after they are made available on netflix.


#6

No do DRM

No, don't. Not DRM built into html5 and therefore built into browsers and opening them up to hidden security holes in the name of DRM theatre. The NSA and other criminals already have enough ways to spy on us without creating yet another channel through our browsers.


#7

'do' ^^^ 'to'


#8

I think he's a bit out of touch, and unwittingly endorsing the end of general purpose computing.


#9

I liked that Tim mentioned flattr on reddit today. I think flattr gets closer to the kinds of economic models we need. Sure, his take on DRM is rather relativistic, but DRM is not a violation of your privacy, DRM is a violation of the economy. I think that the core of the economic problem is that money encourages people to restrict the flow of information, even in the case of libre software or copyleft information. I don't think money that is inherently based on scarcity can ever be an efficient medium of exchange for non-scarce resources. This is not to say such currencies exist yet, or that anyone is even building prototypes to fix the problem. I think if we somehow fixed this disparity, the people of the future might do one better than universal access to all knowledge, which still sounds like an overly optimistic dream to many.


#10

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