Traditional industrial-scale rope-making is all kinds of neat

#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/12/10/traditional-industrial-scale-r.html

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#2

None of this equipment would have looked out of place in the Portsmouth Chandlery and Royal Navy yards ca. 1793.

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#3
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#5

The label on one of the machines might have raised eyebrows in 1793; but no argument aside from that one bit.

(edit: Actually, it wouldn’t have. I forgot the super important rule of visiting an 18th century British naval facility: don’t be impressed…)

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#6

image

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#8

I wonder if this is the rope walk at Mystic Seaport? Looks just like it – but I suppose they would probably all look pretty much alike.

EDIT: Ah! Looks like the one in Mystic is just a segment of a full walk: https://www.mysticseaport.org/locations/ropewalk/

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#9

Coolest part is that the building has to be over 1,000 feet long. That’s a long building! Where is it on Google Maps?

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#10

I assume they cut off the part where they do something to the ends to make sure they don’t unravel. Whatever that is.

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#11

The Charlestown Ropewalk is the last in the US.

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#12

Whipping.

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#13

Is, or was?

Joe Timilty is renovating the old ‘ropes factory’ at the Charlestown Navy Yard, turning it into high end housing.

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#14

It’s here, yes it is.

https://www.google.com/maps/@42.3764074,-71.0547506,452m/data=!3m1!1e3

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#15

From what it said on the machine, above, I assumed this was the Chatham Ropery:

https://www.google.com/maps/@51.3931051,0.5249754,595m/data=!3m1!1e3

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#16

The ends are the worst part of a rope. I just cut them off and throw them away.

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#18

We learned to make rope using the same method in scouts when I was a kid. It’s like magic when the rope comes together from twine.

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#19

A lot of ropewalks were open air, perhaps in fields or along quaysides. Liverpool’s were in fields initially, then the rented/purchased strips of land were turned into streets and ‘RopeWalks’ is now a district of the city. Likewise, Hamburg’s became the Reeperbahn, where ropes may be used differently nowadays.

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#20

Pretty cool, though I’d say this video is even more interesting; the traditional way of making bark rope or Lime Bast Rope. It includes soaking it in water for 4 months.

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