Trial of accused Silk Road mastermind Ross Ulbricht begins. Here's why you should care


#1

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Keysweeper: creepy keystroke logger camouflaged as USB charger
#2

It should be noted that while the trial’s notable for a lot of technical reasons, the dude did try to have six people murdered.


#3

That’s what I thought. But why isn’t he being charged with attempted murder for hire? Is the evidence for it weak or inadmissible – maybe they got it via NSA snooping, hoped to scare the guy into a plea deal, and he didn’t bite?


#4

The Gov’t didn’t feel like they had enough to charge him in the one set-up they had done; the other 5 hits may have just been him paying $650k and getting conned. But because the jude is allowing that evidence in the case, the prosecutors can talk about the allegations and investigation details in open court.

Not a good place to be in if you’re sitting in the defendant’s chair.


#5

I hope this proves to be as entertaining as I hope. Radical Libertarianism doesn’t so much need a trial as a swift kick in the pants.


#6

I’m always laughing at the number of “Free Men” crying about how money laundering and running hits (that were probably/hopefully yet another Bitcoin scam) are “victimless crimes” and we’re “wasting money”.

Granted, I’m 100% in favor of easing/ending the drug war with reasonable caveats, but I’m also fine with Ulbricht going down for these particular charges.


#7

Note to self: Do not call control page “Mastermind.” Call it “Humble Service to the Poor.”


#8

The write-ups of the investigation and arrest were a great read. Almost as madcap as the sagas of Bo Stefan Ericsson.

Both would make for great movies. Perchance @Donald_Petersen could make that happen for us. :smile:


#9

This is the Gizmondo dude who wrecked his Ferrari, right? Oh, man. John Romero’s got nothing on that guy.


#10

But Ulbricht’s defense team, led by renowned terrorism-case defense attorney Joshua Dratel and financed in part by donations from bitcoin mogul Roger Ver

This is the Roger Ver who renounced US citizenship for tax-evasion purposes and is now complaining that he can’t simply buy a new boat to replace the one he burned? Funding an alleged conspirator of “narcotics, hacking and money laundering” probably isn’t helping his application for a visa.


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