What's the worst place you've ever lived?


#34

On my trek across the U.S., I kept it to common fruit, nuts, and large bottles of drinks, instead of individual cans. All-you-can-eat is decent if you’re not afraid of the hygeine.


#35

Its out all the way to Ensenada. (Apparently something happened in Mexicali, I’m surprised we have electricity in my area)
Worst place I ever lived we had some problems with the neighbors in a small and quiet apartment complex, constant parties and the guests were always trying to pick a fight with the other tenants. One day I tried to go to the store late at night only to find the hallway blocked by my neighbor giving some stranger a blow job.
We moved out shortly after that.


#36

Thanks for the heads up. I was about to go try and squeeze in an appointment at the eye doctor, but they’re probably down, too.

I guess that cancels out a trip to the movie theater as well.


#37

No problem. In other news: I should not have posted that I had power. :frowning:


#38

My shift ends just as BART shuts down, so I’d need a car, at which point I might as well live someplace like Pacifica or Crockett/Port Costa. It’s under serious consideration. I like driving and I like small waterfront towns. I could hang out at Sea Bowl!


:game_die: Would You LIKE to Play a Game? :video_game:
#40

Really, really wish I could help. I found a room in EPA for 900. Is Caltrain/Bart an option and going to SSF, Oakland, Hayward, etc?

For food I could donate a rice cooker, that and a hot plate served me great in Phoenix while I got on my feet.

One thing I could do if you’re interested is physically check out rooms or locations on weekends. I also have a decent car and can move a moderate (moderate! :D) amount of stuff.

ETA

I hadn’t read all the comments. Sorry for the dupe info.


:game_die: Would You LIKE to Play a Game? :video_game:
#41

The worst place I’ve lived? In terms of amenities, when I was homeless I stayed in abandoned buildings or slept on rooftops. (That was peak violent crime era - early '90s - needed somewhere safer than the homeless shelter.) Slum apartments with shared bathrooms and no A/C (in the deep south in summer). Couchsurfed for awhile, stayed in a drug dealer’s run-down trailer which wasn’t very nice and occasionally woke up to a shotgun in my face. Section 8 housing next to the projects - cab drivers wouldn’t go near it when I needed a ride home from work, they dropped me off blocks away; wasn’t unusual to have a crackhead trying to break in at 3 AM looking for someone else because he’d ended up on the wrong floor/wrong apartment.

Moving up out of that is difficult. But you can do it. Key is to find somewhere stable/safe enough to not interfere with work, and where you can stay long enough to save up. For me, that was finding friends in a stable/safe place that would let me stay on their couch as long as I helped out.

I have to second the rice cooker idea. Cook as much “pure” food as possible, and stay away from the ramen and Hamburger Helper bullshit.

I didn’t have that, but I had a coffee maker for awhile. In addition to coffee, the hot water could make instant oatmeal, ramen, soups, etc. I also sometimes ‘cooked’ things on the electric heater.


#42

You guys are making me feel lucky… decent dorm roommates and the ‘scariest’ place was a I guess technically 1 bedroom flat but the living room and dining rooms were huge. His parents owned the place so the rent was cheap.
However it wasn’t the best neighborhood, only took 3 days living there to have to say ‘no I live here I am not looking for a “date”’ when getting back from doing laundry and having dinner at the parental units place.

ETA : yes look for shared/room mate listings. The way my job search is going I may end up having to move just me and find a shared space while the wife and kid stay in Seattle. Seriously I just put in a resume for a job in Pleasonton so if that works out I can say hi to all you bay area peeps.


#43

OMG you made me remember! My second apartment, while actually a decent one bedroom and only just barely out of our price range for two 20 year olds working retail…

Was unfortunately located directly north of a hooker stroll. I worked at a record store that closed at midnight. And every night I walked home through a flock of hookers and johns and deflected offers for “dates” (politely cuz shit got scary if you were rude).

Eventually the working girls knew me and would yell at the johns for me. “You leave her alone shes a nice girl!” and the johns would apologize and leave me alone!

Side note: we dont have street walkers anymore do we? Not like in the 90s. I guess they’re all on Craigslist now?


#44

The neighborhood I previously lived in had two to three on the street (right in front of our rented condo building), although I’m not sure if they were actively soliciting or just walking from motel to motel (there were about five within a mile walking distance on PCH). They were always nice and said hi to our dog!

eta: the condo unit was quite nice and secure.


#45

It’s a mix. Stepped outside my door one morning and gave a cheery greeting to a neighbor walking by. Somewhat long awkward moment (door’s close to sidewalk so we were four feet apart, inside personal space for strangers) as I realized she was making morning rounds and she realized I wasn’t a john inviting her in.

Used to have to chase them away from the kids computers in the library as they would jump on all the time to renew their CL listings. (No card needed to sign on at the time)


#46

Making me feel lucky as well. For the most part I’ve had a stable living situation for most of my life. I’ve done the shared living, tight quarters college stuff, but nothing too outrageous.

However, there was this one time in my early 20s, when I was living in Cincinnati with the Atlanta-Detroit drug superhighway passing through my literal front yard. I just got home from a week-long trip, was relaxing on my couch in front of the computer, and a SWAT team shows up outside my window, guns drawn. They were actually there because the place next door to me was getting robbed. Targeted drug-related robbery. Also many times I lived there I just about shit a brick because I expected someone next door to start shooting.


#47

Instead of paying for hotel rooms join a health club so you can shower there, a one month membership in a health club is cheaper than one night in a shitty motel most of the time. Once the issue of showering is out of the way you can snoop around for a place to sleep.

If you don’t have a car then you’ve got fewer options. A guy here in Boston realized the only way he was going to get his college loans paid off was to stop paying rent, so he found a hidden place in a local park, set up a tent every night, and successfully lived that way for most of a year (spring to autumn.) From my own urban exploring I’ve noticed that any piece of no-man’s land in the city (abandoned buildings, overgrown vacant lots) ends up being a crash pad for the homeless and/or drug addicts, so you have to find a spot they won’t frequent. I have entertained the idea of sleeping in a tree using a camping hammock, but climbing a tree and trying to set up a tent in the dark is probably not wise. Ask a friend about using their backyard in exchange for yard work.

I have heard of people renting storage lockers and staying in them for a few months before management gets wise and kicks them out, but it would depend on the set-up/security. You can sometimes find office and industrial space where there’s one room available they have trouble renting to a business-- no amenities, and not zoned for residential so they wont let you live there, but if you can get in and out during the night they won’t know. Peeing in juice bottles and pooping in a 5-gallon bucket (with a top) is gross, but one way to get around not having a bathroom.

It’s all about saving money. Find a food bank or consider freeganism. I have survived for a week on road trips only eating from the ‘value menu’ at Wendy’s, typically baked potatoes for lunch and dinner (they used to $1 but the price has gone up.) A hot dog and a soda at IKEA is only $1.75, I’ve also gone in search of places where they are giving out free samples at the mall, walked back and forth eating from them all multiple times. In my most dire times I ate nothing but generic mac-n-cheese, ramen, and hot dogs, with maybe some frozen vegetables to spice all three up (and get vitamins.) Consider a camp stove too.


#48

My only advice is don’t move to Willits, it’s the worst place I ever lived.


#49

I have had a lot of very good times just outside of Willits. It’s a bit too far to commute though.


#50

Me too! But I lived near the Circle K, and that wasn’t cool at all.


#51

Were some strange things afoot there?


#52

This is excellent advice. My son might not have a place to live by the end of this week, he’s using sleeping in his office and showering at the gym as a fallback. As a parent I should be all worried, but looking back at my own 20s I think he has things well under control.


#53

The worst place I lived was in college; I spent most of my time in the studio, so wasn’t terribly picky, and when I saw a flyer for “$300/month, fully furnished, all utilities incl.”, I said sure. What I got was an unfinished, non-insulated attic in an ancient house that looked like it was going to fall apart (“fully furnished” meant that there was a sofa downstairs.) I was sharing a kitchen and bathroom with monthly renters on the 2nd floor, so there was always some new loony moving in or out, including a 40-something woman who did sage rituals and shat on the floor. She was replaced by a violent drug dealer who liked to set things on fire and draw pictures of me on the kitchen chalkboard getting murdered. Things came to a head when myself and the 1st floor tenants banded together to sneak a building inspector in, who promptly condemned the building as unfit for habitation; the first floor carpet was completely covered in mold and the walls were falling in.


#54

I recently helped a friend move his stuff from an indoor storage locker to his new place, and several of the lockers in his row alone were being used as small apartments. He said that the ‘tenants’ each paid the security guard a bribe every month not to report them and had been there for half a year or so at least.