1967 film showcases the futuristic family home of 1999


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/08/29/1967-film-showcases-the-futuri.html


#2

Mashed potatoes, spinach and papaya? Not even in my futures past!


#3

He is working on mars and a botanist. And he looks a bit like Matt Damon


#4

I didn’t watch the whole thing, but looking at the still images…I am very sure Copernicus did believe the Earth was round, in addition to the heliocentric model of the solar system.

This is why I almost always get annoyed with True/False quizzes, they’re usually poorly composed. I also can’t give straight answers to most opinion poll questions. Teachers and pollsters don’t like when you point out that their questions are wrong.


#5

I don’t know if this was supposed to be literal or conceptual but either way it was full of optimism, something in short supply lately.


#6

Wink Martindale!!!


#7

The “X” is really all you need if you spend most of your time looking up porn in between science lessons.


#8

3 WRONG. YOU FLUNK. DO NOT ARGUE WITH COLOSSUS.

Yes it’s a complete sentence. Now Colossus wants to argue with me!


#9

Yeah, I was surprised by that. Glad I’m not the only one that noticed.


#10

Holy shit, it’s “Brain and brain, what is brain?” chick (also known as Alexandra Spaulding).


#11

I am suitably impressed that you made the connection!


#12

Yea, I don’t know that I particularly care for their vision of the future (much too sanitized), but their optimism is enviable.

Hell, I still miss the optimism of the early internet years, before people figured out that it is mostly a place to buy shit, watch television, and pretend to be happy on social media.

They actually got a lot right, but two big misses:

  • Decline of nationalism. “Let’s just head on down to Mexico for 18 of golf!” “Let’s head down to San Juan for a show!” Would it be that the world was like that today.
  • A “life of leisure.” I actually think that’s not particularly desirable – people’s happiness doesn’t seem very correlated to leisure (within reason). Now, having said this:

In The Overworked American (1991), Juliet Schor showed evidence that Americans were spending more time at paid work in the late 1980s than they had been in the late 1960s. Using government statistics she estimated that total annual work time grew by 163 hours per year between 1969 and 1987. Both women and men worked longer hours, but women worked 300 hours more in 1987 than in 1969 while men worked almost 100 hours more.

(from: http://ucdatadev.berkeley.edu/rsfcensus/papers/Working_Hours_HoutHanley.pdf ). And things have gotten worse since 1987.

In my perfect world, a family would work about 70-90 hours a week. That seems to balance our need to feel productive with our need to not be productive.


#13

At 16:55 I think we just saw the first Grinder hookup


#14

For me that was a time of building parts of the Internet and laughing at the hippies and their predictions.


#15

I wasn’t sure at first, but skipping to the end with that awful music clinched it: there was a 16mm copy of this film at my middle school and Ms. Ruggerio screened it for us. In 1986. It went over about how you’d expect.


#16

I owned and operated an ISP at the time, and really believed in the “democratization of information.”

I was very naive.


#17

Live and learn I guess.


#18

Assuming that you don’t want to legitimize child work, that would mean 35h for each parent, yes?

Move to France and stop Macron from doing a German-style Arbeitsmarktreform.

90h - I don’t think that this works. For a family. As a family.


#19

Yea, I think that’s comfortable for many people. I think I would enjoy working 35 hours a week. 90 would be about 45 per person, which I would think is the maximum for “lets work and have a life too.”

Some folks make work their life – good for them if they want, but it de-emphasizes a lot of other things, like family and community. Then again, a lot of people work that much… because they have to.

I guess 1999 never really arrived…with commute, I know so many people who work 55+ hours a week, and those tend to be skilled, high paying jobs. It’s worse (in the US, at least), for unskilled workers, who often have to work the equivalent of two full-time-ish jobs to get by


#20

This video checks out; I just installed a new hex-pod yesterday. The only part that doesn’t seem accurate is the laughable dearth of pornography on all those screens in their home.