Adobe ebook DRM changeover means


#1

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#2

They don't lose ebooks they already have, but they won't be able to buy new ones and their reader will grow increasingly useless as time goes on, even if it works perfectly fine. Adobe is perfectly fine with this, as long as it means you buy new e-readers and give them their cut of the licensing for the DRM again.

Did I mention Adobe is run by a bunch of jerks?


#3

Obligatory link:
http://xkcd.com/488/


#4

My question is, will people simply accept this, or will there be enough of an uprising that Adobe will be forced to rethink this change?

My feeling is it could go either way, but if it's the former--if people simply accept it--I think this could spread beyond Adobe.


#5

Well, I'm glad I decided a few months back to strip the DRM out of all the ebooks I've bought over the years, and set up a not-too-annoying process for new ebooks.


#6

DRM, LOL - We all knew this day was coming. I'd like to remind everyone that their local library typically has a huge selection of regular books, e-books & audio books. I mean, do you really need to own the book, or just read it and return it?

Finally, a plug for the Humble Audio Book Bundle:
http://blog.humblebundle.com/post/74082211858/introducing-the-humble-audiobook-bundle-featuring


#7

A plug which comes, unfortunately, less than an hour after that bundle ended. It was a good bundle though. the Humble Bundle is a lot like a Steam sale for me - I end up getting something for very cheap, but it's something that I normally would never have purchased, so I guess it works out okay for all concerned. I think there was a humble ebook bundle at one point too.


#8

Hopefully the relevant ebook management plugins will be quickly updated to deal this, so that I can continue to import my legally purchased ebooks into my preferred reading tools.


#9

quote="TooGoodToCheck_, post:7, topic:21790"]
I think there was a humble ebook bundle at one point too.
[/quote]

There's actually been 2 of them (1, 2)

I'm not sure what I think of the Humble Bundle concept. In general, I like it, because it's usually a bunch of good stuff, for cheap, and it raises money for good causes. But on the other hand, I keep buying stuff that I don't really need, and don't end up using. For example, the current Sid Meier Bundle. Hrmm.


#10

Obligatory link:
http://xkcd.com/488/105

For the lazy:


#11

My question is, will people simply accept this, or will there be enough of an uprising that Adobe will be forced to rethink this change?

Many simply ditch the hassle and pirate. And, corporations like Adobe only have themselves to blame for it.

Apple showed the kicking and screaming music industry a long time ago that if you make media purchases easy, cheap and conveniently DRM-free, there's money to be made. I guess it still hasn't sunk in with many of the inbred corporatists that run corporations like Adobe.


#12

I'm in the habit of just getting whatever shows up on there now and allocating everything to whatever charity most appeals to me (usually Child's Play). Usually there's at least one thing in each bundle that I probably wouldn't have taken enough interest in to buy individually, but turns out to be really fun.


#13

Use Calibre and Apprentice Alf's unDRM plugins, and you have your books back, in any format you like, to be read on pretty much any reader you like.


#14

Trying to access content that is protected with Adobe's existing DRM is already a frustrating and baffling process. I wouldn't have said it was possible to make the whole experience suck more, but they have some very smart people at Adobe and they're obviously determined to give it their best shot.


#15

Do the unDRM plugins work with this new DRM? I prefer Google's e-book reader to Amazon's, but I'll go back to buying for Kindle if I can't crack the DRM on Google's books.


#16

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