Apple's new parental control: Daily Stormer is in, sex-ed is out


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/10/19/daily-stormer-for-kids.html


#2

The horror that some parents might have to like… actually talk to their kids about these things and you know… be a parent. Lets just trust Siri, she knows best.


#3

It’s like a PG-13 movie.


#4

Vibrators are gendered, per se?


#5

Mmm. I don’t think of them as gendered. There are all kinds of shapes for vibrators, not just long cylinders. And locations on a person’s body where they can be of use crosses gender lines.


While I think I could be a better parent these days, especially regarding sex education and acceptance, I’m damned glad I no longer have to be.


#6

Per se? No.

Effectively, and culturally, I’d say so.


#7

I’m shocked, shocked that a content filtering product is working in such a manner!!

No, wait, I’m not, actually. TBH, I was rather expecting this; content filters are very difficult to get right and require nearly constant maintenance to not lag too far behind the weird, weird web.

(My creds: I am (sadly) the admin for the nanny filter at the company I work for, which is ironic because I’m against content filtering on almost a religious level. However, it also acts as a security appliance, and keeps our employees on task instead of looking at failbook all day long.)


#8

I’ve been wondering how to get Apple’s attention that their filter will SCREEN OUT anything that has the word “Asian” somewhere in the latter part of the url (only past the slash “/” www.sample.com/example-boring-asian-article-but-not-nfsw.html), which is frustrating because it doesn’t matter if it is a news site or whatever. I assume it’s because so many porn searches specifically call out “Asians”

Yes, I do have filtering turned on, on my iPhone, though I’m an adult. And Asian.


#9

*Implied PG for illustrative purposes only, actual PG not included.


#10

Am guessing that you run across some really wild sites. Do share :slight_smile:


#11

So it turns out that when you combine unsubtle filtering rules that are set by an unknown third party, with the various contradictory, irrational impulses of people to block what they don’t like, you get a system that fundamentally doesn’t work?

Who ever would have guessed?


#12

Security piece notwithstanding, that should be handled by an “Acceptable Use Policy” (AUP) and productivity metrics. Nobody should really give a shit if they watch failbook half the day if they can still get the job done properly.
/corporate-stupidity-rant
(Not your fault, I know.)


#13

There’s an AUP in place as well. the way I look at it, we are using it largely for security and keeping people from using the internet bandwidth for non-work purposes. (technically, what I’m doing now, but I do read boing boing to keep on on technical trends…)


#14

I generally respect people’s privacy; unless HR and/or management needs data for an investigation, I don’t go poking around in the tracking data unless I have to. (I know, that pesky ethical standard keeping me from playing voyeur… :smiley: )


#15

But that’s how you validate that the system is working! :rofl:


#16

Well, in that case, I look at my own tracking data. :stuck_out_tongue:

And strangely enough, our user base is actually pretty good about behaving and reporting in if the filtering fails.


#17

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