Arrests and outrage at Flood Wall Street


#1

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#2

I’m glad that the cops are protecting that bull so hard. I’d hate to see it brought down, which would cause an immediate cessation of all financial transactions in the nearby stock and commodities exchanges.


#3

I am always struck in these events how Wall Street literally has a golden calf on its doorstep.

I mean, if some satirist were to write that, it would be dismissed as too on-the-nose to be believable. But nope, there’s a golden idol to money just sitting there being protected from those who would want to stop its worship.


#4

…would it could be boiled in its mother’s milk…


#5

Can somebody locate that screenshot from The Simpsons, where the bull is in handcuffs and led away by SEC agents?

It was in some episode from NYC, about 2-seconds background scene.


#6

If only. A bronze calf is only a third-place idol.


#7

Do they have a Bear statue to stick there instead when the market is doing badly?

Edit: Heh. They do in Frankfurt.


#8

I don’t know why the bear gets such a bad rap—at least a bear shits in the woods. In Wall Street, the bullshit is EVERYWHERE.


#9

That explains the stink.


#10

The “outrage” in the title of this article presumably refers to the fact that NYC taxpayers foot the bill for all of this nonsense. Undoubtedly the cops will do something dumb and ppl will sue the city which NYC taxpayers will also pay for. Why not protest in Washington, where people are actually legislating (and where federal monies can pick up the bill for the aftermath)? So annoying. FWIW, Gothamist is painting a much different picture of what is going on over there. Seems more like a bunch of hippies chanting an eating free pizza from their account.


#11

And who pays the money to influence those legislators, I wonder?


#12

If you are saying that a well dressed lobbyist who bathes on a regular basis is going to be more persuasive than the costumed free-for-all, I’m agreeing with you. Point is, as least the deep pockets are smart enough to pick the right venue to present their agenda.


#13

What’s wrong with protesting the source of the corruption and inequity rather than (or in addition to) their Washington lackeys?


#14

Source of the corruption and inequality? Do you know who works at the exchange? You probably make more than most of the traders who work there. Also, I stated in my original comment what is “wrong with” it. It is not fair for New Yorkers be footing the bill for something that is not a New York issue. This discussion just melted.

This type of “protesting” is so lazy, anyway. It is one thing to try raise awareness. But in the digital era, people with this kind of time and energy on their hands could certainly be putting it to much better use furthering their (and presumably our) cause than dressing up and trying to get on TV. It is aggravating to see people reinforcing the negative stigma that already tends to be associated with people who aggressive about environmental protection.


#15

Lazy bums, going out into the real world to protest instead of sitting behind a computer screen and ranting via web comment. No appreciation for us TRUE heroes, amirite??


#16

Lazy in the sense that-- if you are going to physically go out and do something, why not narrow the scope of what is being protested from vague rubbish like “capitalism,” to something like “tax breaks given to oil companies.” Then instead of marching around with a painted face looking for free pizza, put on some normal clothes and schedule a meeting with a senator. Or… for extra credit… get some signatures on a petition, then schedule a meeting with a senator. Chances are there still might be some free pizza involved. Win - win.


#17

And the 2008 prayer session would have been pure hack. We get the metaphor already, please try to use a little subtlety.

I imagine it would be pretty difficult to understand a protest like this, if I actually thought everyone could simply schedule a meeting with a senator instead. Really, it would mean I have a pretty poor understanding of all sorts of things.


#18

Also, the other scenario prevents this :confused:


#19

Your suggestion is just so lazy. Lazy in the sense that you didn’t go out into the street during the protest and accost each and every member of the march. Instead of posting anonymously on a board know for it’s anarcho-snarkonics, for extra points, you could expound an actual philosophy of culture in ancient Greece on the steps of the Parthenon.

I dunno, the hipster youth of today, I tell you.


#20

For the accosting part, the cops take care of that part. And I help pay the cops’ salary. So I guess that I am indirectly accosting them. Okay, that part may have fed your “snarkonics” remark. But, what I’m suggesting is much less “anarcho” than what is currently transpiring in the FiDi. I wouldn’t exactly characterize bitching about having to pay for a protest that has nothing to do with my city “expounding on philosophy,” but I appreciate the flattery. Frankly, it would be pretty cool if there were some realistic way to return to the variety of democracy that you were presumably alluding to with your reference to the steps of the Parthenon. Finally, you are assuming quite a bit (errantly so) if your “hipster youth” remark was directly toward me.