Bible references make very weak passwords


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/01/07/bible-references-make-very-wea.html


Man in stock footage is typing nonsense
#2

Which is why all mythologically-derived passwords should draw from trickster figures; obviously.

Or the God Emperor of Mankind; since The Emperor Protects.


#3

Hey, @Falc – oh, wait. People are still doing this sort of shit in 2017?


#4

Galatians 6:7 says god can’t be mocked, and yet a good half-dozen snipes have suggested themselves in the time it’s taken me to post this


#5

the 30th most common password overall, a bit behind “tigger” (No. 22)

No! I’m the only one!


#6

Speaking of divine non-mockery; I get the impression that special concern for the handling of the name of god is more of a Jewish thing; though a lot of early-modern Christian stuff invokes the idea of people anagramatizing or otherwise mutilating the name or sacred texts for nefarious magical purposes; does anyone know if there are any extant, at-least-vaguely-numerous, christian groups that might be troubled by the fact that, if used as a password, the lamb of god is likely to find himself salted and hashed?

That’s obviously not the primary reason why using it as a password is a terrible plan; but the rules for handling ritually significant names can get pretty involved.


#7

Passwords smasswords…just pray the hackers away.


#8

how popular is ‘Ezekiel2517’?


#9

It’s pretty obviously taking the godster’s name in vain to use it as a password, and I know plenty of Christians would frown on it for that reason. I haven’t heard of xtians using special orthographic tricks to get around the letter of the law; that sounds like something a christian rabbi would do, and I’m not sure there is such a thing (jesuits maybe?). I gather there are special procedures in Islam for referring to Al and the Prophets, but I don’t know anything about that either.

Conversely, as I understand it, if you made your password a Buddhist prayer wheel, then the more it is “turned”, the better. Though 0mManiPadmeHum is still easily guessed.


#10

The famous fish symbol as a Christian identifier comes from an acronym of the Greek, “Jesus Christ. Son of God, Saviour”.

I’m not a theologian, but I’m pretty sure using a Biblical chapter and verse wouldn’t matter. Given how freely the name of Jesus is invoked, I doubt that using the name in a non-blasphemous password would be a problem.


#11

From the article: “CT has previously reported on how hacking can affect Christians, including a data breach at affair-centered dating site Ashley Madison…”

So apparently the problem with Christians using Ashley Madison is their failure to use strong passwords. Another thorny theological question settled.


#12

Smartest man in the world


#13

Just that first panel on its own is a security red flag. It should just say failed, not tell you the password is incomplete.

Maybe someone should have told Ozymandias about Schneier’s Law.


#14

What about “austin316”?


#15

Reminds me of that movie The Ninth Gate. This really wealthy Satan worshipper brings Johnny Depp into the secure vault where he keeps his most valuable books and the password he punches into the keypad to open the door is “6-6-6”. Yeah, that’s totally going to confound any thieves trying to steal satanic texts.


#16

I love that scene! What gets me is that there’s a little pause before the final six, and I’m convinced that the pause is meant to be a reverent pause. Which is rather silly, but I think intentionally tongue in cheek.


#17

Christ, what a password.


#18


#19

Conversely, some passwords would make splendid bible versus. :thinking:


#20

I like Ezekiel 23-20 better.