Can time travelers go back in time and have sex with themselves? Astrophysicists investigate

Hm. I wonder if PornHub has a “Glory Wormhole” category?

eta: Oh yeah, that Oglaf comic.

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Also explored in David Gerrold’s 1973 novel “The Man Who Folded Himself”

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“So there’s this buncha guys called (ahem) ‘The Boogaloo Boys’ . . . who wear Hawaiian shirts, and idolize a cartoon frog named ‘Pepe’ . . . they’re a right wing military squad bent on a new civil war.”

“Yeah, sure, gimme a break, that’s sounds like some gag from a Vonnegut book.”

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More seriously than this, I suppose.

184 • Extra Ordinary

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No but The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame should.

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I’m sure there’s a Chuck Tingle book that covers this.

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Where did you think the term “do yourself a favor” came from.

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:+1:

Was looking for someone to mention this, and was going to make it if there wasn’t one

Well, we have time crystals, our problem with energy sources is money/scaling/engineering/policy and not physics, and also, FTL is really closely related to time travel anyway, so in a sense they did?

There are many kinds of time travel. This is a good overview of the main options available in fiction, for example.

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I mean, the evil pterosaur makes a valid point, does he not?

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If you had sex with another version of yourself, would that make you gay, or just at the very pinnacle of masturbation technology?

As regards sexual intercourse with older or younger copies of yourself, it’s incest in branching or changeable timelines, and masturbation in inevitable timelines. In either case, yes, it is gay.

Basic Time Travel Etiquette

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How about a clone?

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Are we talking your actual grown-from-your-DNA clones, or Futurama-style time-paradox duplicates?

oh yeah i know theres many ways of writing fictional time travel. I really enjoy the idea that if you went back in time you wouldnt be able to change anything because there is only one timeline and you already been there and the present existed as it does because your time travel was always part of the timeline. Thats what they did in the harry potter books (but weirdly not at all in the cursed child play). I guess i was speaking more that that (the infinite branching timelines) is how i think it would work in reality if it were possible. I dont believe paradoxes could exist like in back to the future. either theres a singular timeline and your actions as a time traveller were always part of it (like you couldn’t kill your grandfather because your grandfather lived so obviously you must have failed) or you succeed in killing your grandfather and can only travel on a new timeline dimension you created even though you were born in another dimensional timeline you can never get back to. Its all probably ridiculous, but those are my two favorite theories.

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That’d be one heck of a reach-around.

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I think those are really the only two models you can use in fiction without introducing plot holes and/or serious amounts of handwaving. If the story’s told with enough élan, I guess you can mostly get away with it, but at some level it’s still going to be unsatisfying (at least to me).

Off the top of my head, the only exception I can think of is the Doctor Who story where an attempt to change history literally breaks time: so Churchill rules Britain as Caesar, Charles Dickens is pushing his latest novel on breakfast TV, there’s a secret facility inside a pyramid that Cleopatra sold to JFK, and there are signs in Hyde Park warning you not to feed the pterosaurs.

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