Carmen Ortiz, the prosecutor who hounded Aaron Swartz, is retiring


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/01/15/carmen-ortiz-the-prosecutor-w.html


#2



#3

May her legacy of hounding a young man who wanted information to be free, until he died, haunt her to the end of her days.


#4

Telling her kind that they are the bad guy just never gets through their thick hide of privilege, ignorance, and professional advancement.


#5

She won’t lose a moment’s sleep over it, any more than did the people who hounded Alan Turing. Let’s face it, for prosecutors “psychopathic” is an asset.

Edit - incidentally, Cotton Mather. Truly in a great tradition.


#6

Oh I’m sure there’s a place for her in Trump’s America. Court of Appeals, maybe? She’s far too impartial and knowledgeable for the SCOTUS.


#7

She wants to spend more time ruining her family’s lives.


#8

How hard must it be to have your entire career boiled down to one bad decision?


#9

For her?

Not hard enough.


#10

Ms. Ortiz has confessed to some regrets about the Schwartz case. Her henchman who drove it has not. The “tough on crime” schtick has has been an ethical atrocity everywhere, including Boston. She had notions of running for Governor here in Massachusetts. It would have been the first time I had actively campaigned against a candidate, regardless of who else wanted the job. I am glad to see her go,.


#11

Saying she is responsible is careless since recognizing depression and other mental health issues is so very important. I’ve read Boing Boing for years and seen you speak and am writing because this site is almost always above this level of casualness. Thanks for everything else.


#12

Calling it a bad decision is minimizing it, and this “bad decision” is representative of her activities across her career.


#13

“Together we prosecuted many significant cases that have resonated around the nation”

The job of a prosecutor is not to be a media celebrity or to “resonate around the nation”. It is to ensure that the State brings proper prosecutions against people where reasonable probability exists that they have committed a crime. It seems to me that her choice of expression tells you something about her attitude.


#14

I’m hoping this shit in the face trend starts to really take off.


#15

Complete non-sequitur. People with mental illnesses can be mistreated. She is (was) a government official, the word “responsible” is one that should be thrown around a lot on that element alone.


#16

No offense, but this doesn’t make any sense, may we assume English is probably not your first language?
And welcome to BoingBoing! :slight_smile:


#17

There is no ignorance. Most of these people know exactly what they are doing; they are convinced they are doing what someone’s gotta do: be tough, draw lines, defend civilisation as they know it from the assaults of naive wishful-thinkers that would destroy All That Is Good And Proper in name of unpractical ideals. And of course, looking out for n.1, manipulating public sentiment to bolster one’s career. It’s how the game is played, and if a few weaklings have to be sacrificed, well, sucks to be them.

It’s not ignorance, it’s cynicism.


#18

Pontius Pilate was probably a hell of a prefect too.


#19

If there was any justice…


#20

Poor assumption. First language.