Comparing a high-quality Rolex knockoff with a real one

Why do people buy art? Rolex ain’t art but it holds it’s value quite well and is built like an old tractor.

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You can fake a serial number on the watch (and, of course, the fakes have fake serial numbers), but you can’t fake the call to the authorized Rolex dealer who matches it to a singular watch. Also, if the fake watch gets the font slightly incorrect, imagine them trying to fake the warranty papers, presentation box, store with snotty clerks, etc.

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Probably not. They are copying everything including the movement and materials of construction.

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Even though they are made almost entirely by robots, there’s still a lot of artistry in the design. If you like Rube Goldberg machines (and who here doesn’t?) then a mechanical watch should hold some appeal to you.

You’re right about holding their value. Good luck getting your hands on a new Daytona for list price and any used model will cost even more. New Daytonas tend to go to the very best Rolex customers. I happen to believe there’s a bubble there that could pop because the price increases don’t seem sustainable, but who knows?

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If you get joy looking at a hunk of metal you paid way too much for, great. Me, if it tells time, I’m good. Based on the exactitude of the replica, all the materials, down to a replica movement, I’m wondering if the fake is really functionally inferior. Like, what’s the difference in durability and such? Oh no, I hear you say. It doesn’t matter. It’s not real. OK. So what?

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Serial number the case and for the caliber. Rolex is a good watch to fake because they rarely have glass case back.

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One thing I noticed when they were comparing the movements was the tool marks on the fake’s screwheads. That’s one of the tip-offs that the warranty has been voided by an unauthorized service. The authorized services (Cartier for Cartier, Rolex for Rolex) have specially manufactured tools just to ensure that there aren’t any tool marks leaving gouges in the screwheads.

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When I was in high school someone gave me a cheap Rolex copy. One of my uncles had a real Rolex, and it was pretty obvious. A key tell was that the cheap watch had an ordinary quartz movement, and the Rolex doesn’t. So if you knew that, you could see at a glance which was fake.

But it’s not surprising that people would spend more money to get something that was almost, but not quite, as good as the original, knowing it would fool people.

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The serial number will be on the accompanying paperwork, and the backs are very easy to unscrew - with the correct tool. Again, just call the authorized Rolex dealer…

Edit: $4.99 watch back tool

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Most JAXA sets don’t have Rolex tips. If you want to go cheap buy a Bergeon knockoff Rolex opener.

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I’ve unscrewed (low-value) dive watch backs with a pair of needle-nosed pliers. But, you want to match the tools to the watch if it might be a real one - don’t be the guy that f#@ked up the watch worth more than you are.

Just for giggles, meet the watchdials made out of slices of meteorite:

image

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They might be on to something, though. The steel used for the case and the bracelet for the real Rolex is a specific alloy and completely solid where it can be.

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A lot. They Will use poor hairsprings and balance wheels the finish of the pinions etc won’t be very good. One good thing about a Rolex is that it’s built to last. They have the money for the metals, tools etc that pirates simply can’t match.

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And he’ll be in higher demand with higher fees! :smile:

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Super nerdy video that starts off with a Daytona. I am a mild watch enthusiast, though I don’t watch watch videos online, but I’m a Dead & Company fan, so this was recommended to me on YouTube. He’s most certainly VERY knowledgable and into the “hobby”.

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Expect for synthetic diamonds. They exactly the same as natural ones just cheaper. One machine that can tell the difference costs 7900€.

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I was referring to metals, but sure.

When you say ‘synthetic diamonds’ are you referring to the actual diamond-diamonds cooked up in the toric pressure cookers? De Beers started etching a serial number on the girdles of their diamonds to keep them identifiable. How long do you think it took the diamond synthesizers to start faking their own serial numbers? But, the whole point of a serial number is to check with the issuer before buying.

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What odd things. $1200 for a watch that’s hard to repair/maintain (a quality watchmaker may not want to handle it), pressure test = rebuilt OK = ?). I wonder what the total available market is for this unit & what that means for the considerable NRE required?

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More likely remove serial numbers from them. Naturals cost More…

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