Congregants allegedly pressured to to sell their own blood and donate the funds to their church

:smiling_imp:

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Blood for the Blood God!
Skulls for the Throne of Khorne!
(sleigh bells)

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Often with ulterior motives? There is always one underlying motive with anything good a church might do, and that is more money/power/influence to the church. They are not altruistic, they are corporations.

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I know there are good people in the world. I do not believe there are good religions. Not when you dig right down to the bedrock of the things and take a good hard look at their bones and the people manipulating them. Some are obviously worse than others; their bones are on display. All of them are horror shows.

But that’s just, like, my opinion.

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Are they really Christian?

Blood

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The Catholics distribute the blood of Christ at mass, so they’re more on the “supply” side of the equation.

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Their biscuits are a bit on the small side and they only let you have one. Catholics: You wouldn’t want them running your buffet.

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I thought there were laws against that kind of thing? I mean, I know they can be circumvented to some degree (“we’re not paying for your blood, we’re just paying for your ‘travel expenses’”), but not like this.

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If you help them in the distribution, you can have some of the leftovers.

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but they’re giving blood so that’s good right? or are these blood banks strictly for profit?

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Radiolab did an excellent piece on blood banks several years ago.

The take away is that giving blood is good and important, but the business of blood banks is, like so much in our society, far from squeaky clean.

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Heatworm:

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Sadly, Shai-hulud has become an endangered species due to devestation of the sand-trouts’ natural habitat during the climate catastrophe brought on by generations of over-harvesting followed by well-meaning but misguided attempts by environmental religious extremists to change the face of Arrakis.

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tenor-1

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This is appalling and so obviously contra-indicated by the Bible itself. (e.g., 1 Corinthians 6:19-20)

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Next up: Kidneys and bone marrow.

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As an altar boy, I and my impious altar boy cohorts would occasionally snag some unblessed hosts to ‘study’ and snack on. (They were stored in an ornate jar in the church sacristy, aka, the mass staging room.) The advantage of being part of the system… back then, anyway.

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That is one creepy Horror Movie phrase, isn’t it?

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It sort of is! But what was really creepy was the priests’ rectory attached to the sacristy. There were stories passed around about ghostly goings on in the then 110 year old rectory (of course), and about the night of the 1965 “Great Blackout” of the US north-east and parts of Canada. Some joker in the neighborhood jump-started a story about the sacristy’s 6’ tall angel statue that was set near one of the large windows and therefore always visible to anyone just outside; the story: On the night of the blackout, the wings of the statue could be seen slowly flapping. Years passed, the stories lingered and got passed down, I become an altar boy, then – boom – my father (buddy-buddy with the clergy, and bowled weekly with one of the priests) volunteers me (shit!) to man the rectory on a night when all the priests and the sexton are out. Even as an altar boy, I didn’t believe in ghosts and such… but I still did have an imagination. Lots of creaks and moans (understandable) from that old rectory, and all magnified in my mind by the stories. I was definitely creeped out and never moved from the sofa I sat on that night.

Oh, The Window. It’s the one just to the left of the tastefully elaborate entrance at the top of the stairs. The rectory is now an apartment building as is the church it was once attached to. (I wonder if the rather tunnel-like granite-walled way that connected the two is still there. Fuel for future ghost stories!)

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