Constructive Dating Advice


#21

The line they were on was the line to buy bread!


#22

If I’m only one laughing at out loud at my own jokes, I hope I never find that out.


#23

No, I’ve been chuckling to myself about boats being the predecessor to the internet for an hour.


#24

Whew .


#25

I think boats might be hardwired to comedy in my brain. “I’m on a boat”, “It might be a boat, we’ve always wanted one of those”, “What most people don’t realize is that boats need fuel.”

It’s all comedy gold.


#26

I thought the joke was that the internet DID exist in the mid 90’s?


#27

Mid-30s in our case, slightly over a decade ago. Worked great!


#28

Well… it didbut it hadn’t gone totally mainstream at that point yet. I remember at some big division wide meeting (1993) about the internet and the example was Coca-Cola having a website. All I could think was “Why would I go to a Coca-Cola website? I want a Coke, not read about Coke”. I’m not a visionary.


#29

To be on topic … take my dating advice for what it’s worth (nothing) but I’ll give it anyway.

  1. Be yourself. You don’t want to be with anyone who likes some other pretend version of yourself.

  2. Be flexible. You’re not looking for perfection. You’re looking for someone to enjoy life with. That doesn’t require perfection.

  3. Be honest. Honest with the other person, honest with yourself. It’s fine to continue a relationship knowing it’s not going to be a forever thing – as long as you’re both on the same page about that, there’s no harm there.

  4. Aside from specific online-or-similar-dating, the more you try to look the harder of a time you’ll have.


#30

Not only is it okay to fail, it’s vital to the entire operation.

Because if you don’t fail it’s because you haven’t tried.

And if you haven’t tried, haven’t taken the first tentative step, haven’t emotionally put things out there with a “I like you and want to go on a romantic date” you’re definitely not going to succeed.

And you’re going to fail. And you’re going to figure out that failing sucks, but that frankly, it’s not necessarily anything wrong with you. That the person wasn’t right, or the time wasn’t right, or whatever, it’s irrelevant. The lesson is that you are going to fail and keep failing until the time that you don’t. And that don’t failing bit, the bit that you eventually earned, well, it’s all those failures that are going to keep reminding you to keep on don’t failing.


#31

And I thought the joke was that daneel said “waves” and lamaranagram said “boat” :laughing:


#32

You gotta fix that. My wife and I just went on a date last night. With each other even!


#33

We go on dates. Every couple of weeks or so we go out to eat plus we travel when we can.


#34

Yes that’s what made me say that. But listen it’s been dissected enough now. So it’s not funny anymore (which implies it once was, which might be an alternative fact). I’ll try again tomorrow.


#35

If you want to do that, I recommend reading through Doctor NerdLove’s website. There’s lots of useful advice about how to create online dating profiles, how to compose messages, and basically the whole online dating experience.


#36

I actually met my wife through a coworker, he basically thought we were both so weird that we just might hit it off, he was right!

May I suggest that this might not necessarily be a bad thing? After all, you’re not looking to date you, you’re looking for someone who you find interesting and that has more to do with how that person experiences and shares the things she/he likes than what things he/she likes. Another way to look at it is that I certainly wouldn’t suggest looking to meet a person who will fit into what could be described as your “comfort zone”.

This is SNL, so of course they are going to make the joke really obvious, it’s still SNL so the joke they purposefully attempt to make is the wrong joke, fast forward to 2:54:

  • Touch my tit

That’ts not the don’t, if it were, then it would really be a no-win scenario, the joke is in how men cope with rejection and how they are blind to it in themselves but not in others.

Every time one of the guys throws a fit after being rejected, another guy like him has noticed how he has failed, he can see how that behavior won’t get him anywhere, so he comes in and takes his place. After he gets rejected too, he too will lash out. If there are any DOs you can rescue from this video, and they’re good ones, it’s these:

DO prepare to be rejected.
DO move on.
DO keep trying anyway.


#37

This was well stated, if missing one salient point:

DON’T act like a whiny, butthurt baby when rejection does happen; that’s not an appealing behavior trait for anyone, ever.


#38

I’m being polite when I say “not into the same things I am”. The truth is that the women my age that I meet aren’t really into anything at all. Not seriously anyway. Like let’s say movies, everyone is into movies, but I am yet to find a woman south of 50 who can really hold an insightful conversation on movies. I don’t need the person to like the same movies I do, heck, it would be more interesting if they didn’t but at least be able to explain why you like the movies you do. Same goes for politics, books, interior design, history, whatever.
Sometimes I wish I was gay. I have no trouble finding guys who will get into it with me about movies.


#39

Then you need to look into a new method to find potential partners. Because there are a ton of insightful, intelligent, engaged folks of all genders out there.

I think in this modern era, finding the right way (be that location, or medium, or opportunity, or whatever) makes all the difference, because so many folk self-select out of stereotypical locations or events/activities now.


#40

Oh dear, oh dear. You were doing so well, i was on your side up until this comment. This is a wee bit disparaging to half the population, no? If you can’t find a woman younger than 50 who is able to discuss such topics in depth then you’re really not trying. Seriously. Those topics you listed, are they by chance male-centric with regard to content? Do you read many books from female authors? Do you love military history? I’d start by questioning your gender bias, maybe do an implicit association test (IAT) or something.