Culturally insensitive 1979 TV commercial for Faygo's Redpop, starring M*A*S*H star Jamie Farr


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/07/28/culturally-insensitive-1979-tv.html


#2

Whatthefuck?

Damn. I can’t believe any of that was made. Especially with the Thanksgiving table being an ethnic blend of colors.

I mean, damn.


#3

“Culturally insensitive”? Why not just call it what it is – racist?


#4

I dunno, there’s a black pilgrim. Maybe it is progressive?

Also, I can see how this became the drink of choice of ICP. I am guessing that commercial is appreciated on different levels on drugs.


#5

Nope; tokenism isn’t progress.


#6
Culturally insensitive 1979 TV commercial for Faygo's Redpop, starring Jamie Farr of M*A*S*H
That is the most 1970s sentence.

#7

That’s context dependent… Mere depiction of otherness is pretty much always the first step towards actual inclusion and acceptance. It’s all a matter of how far you’ve gotten on the curve.


#8

I could go for a redpop right now. Or maybe a Rock n’ Rye…


#9

Now whenever I hear name Faygo the only thing that comes to mind is racists and juggalos. I think I’ll stick to iced tea.


#10


#11

I will not let their cream soda get sullied by anyone. Juggalos are just the underclass, and it’s taxing to pile on the hate when they’ve never done anything to me, either.


#12

“If life is to survive on this planet, there must be a decontamination of the Earth. I think this will be accompanied by an evolutionary process that will result in a drastic reduction of the population of males.”

“Today the Frankenstein phenomenon is omnipresent . . . in . . . phallocratic technology. . . . Transsexualism is an example of male surgical siring which invades the female world with substitutes.”

“The surgeons and hormone therapists of the transsexual kingdom . . . can be said to produce feminine persons. They cannot produce women.”

(Mary Daly)


#13

I think the Diet Faygo guy at the end was Wayne Knight.


#14

Ask your kids if they know what “sitting Indian style” means. If they are high school or younger (maybe even college) they’ll have no idea. They might know it as “pretzel style” or “sitting like a pretzel”.

When I told my daughter she called me a racist.

Edit - shit I’m getting my 1970s/80s Indian terms confused. I meant “Indian Giver” … it went like this:

Me: Give that back to your sister
Kid: Why?
Me: Because you already gave it to her. You can’t take something back you already gave. C’mon don’t be an Ind… Uh don’t be an … Just don’t do that.
Kid: Seriously dad?
Me: Yes, seriously. And just curious - what do you call someone who gives something away then takes it back?
Kid: I … uh …I dunno, don’t have a word for that.
Me (quietly): When I was a kid, it was called an Indian giver.
(pause)
Kid: You’re racist.

So they might know sitting “Indian Style” (not racist?) but “Indian Giver” (racist) I’m guessing they haven’t heard.


#15

Thanks, ad hominem arguments ALWAYS change my mind!


#16

I guess it could have read: “Culturally insensitive 1979 TV commercial for Faygo’s Redpop, starring Jamie Farr of MAS*H that appeared during an episode of the Gong Show.”


#17

Sounds like you’re an awesome parent! (in case it’s not clear, I mean that…)


#18
  1. I would not presume to change your mind.

  2. Actual quotes, when not take unduly from their context, can hardly be said to constitute an ad hominem attack.

  3. You were the one who started substituting quotes for arguments.

  4. Arguments from authority never change MY mind.


#19

Maybe so, but given that you chose a bunch of quotes, on different topics, by the same person I quoted, um yeah, that does constitute an ad hominem attack. You’re blaming the messenger, not the message.

Ah well, arguments from anonymous online commenters never seem to change my mind either, so hey, I hope you have a great day. :relaxed:


#20

Ok… I’ll try to be less of a douchebag.

Tokenism becomes a problem at some point. But you also have to start somewhere. People of the 70s were not going to immediately embrace a well-rounded and motivated openly gay character. So you start with a mere depiction of the concept, including it in people’s vocabulary and making them realize it’s a thing. Then you can start educating them about the actual depth of the concept.