Dungeon Keeper remake snarls classic gameplay in "scam" payment model


#1

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#2

It’s still shocking to me that people will pay to play any of these games. The second any game tells me

“Hey you ran out of X you can’t play for the next two days or you could just buy more X now”

I’m out of there. Hell the game are not even good why the fuck are people paying to play bad farm sims and bejeweled clones.

I also think there needs to be some investigations and laws passed on the way these games use techniques that would be outlawed in any casino to separate you from your money. Changing gameplay based on the spending pattern of the player needs to be outlawed. Unfortunately in the corporate run world we live in now nothing will ever change though. imagine if the game show scandal hit now, no one in congress would do shit about it.


#3

This is one of a handful of games that I was specifically hoping would make it onto mobile platforms. Touch screen interactions seem like a natural fit for this kind of game. I was naturally very excited when I first heard it had come out, but that excitement quickly turned into disgust as started to play the game and realize exactly what EA had done to another beloved franchise from my childhood.

The worst part is that it currently has a 4.5 star rating on the play store. That really makes me want to vomit…


#4

See also:

http://bbs.boingboing.net/t/a-week-with-dungeon-keeper-mobile/21619/last


#5

I downloaded, played, and deleted this ripoff in about half an hour yesterday. I’m now playing Space Hulk, and feel much better.


#6

It’s still shocking to me that people will pay to play any of these games. The second any game tells me “Hey you ran out of X you can’t play for the next two days or you could just buy more X now” I’m out of there.

That’s just because the games that use this model today generally aren’t that good. But what if most/all games work this way in the future? Would this really cause mass abandonment of gaming or would people just grumble a bit and then pay up?

I also think there needs to be some investigations and laws passed on the way these games use techniques that would be outlawed in any casino to separate you from your money. Changing gameplay based on the spending pattern of the player needs to be outlawed.

I’m not sure how this would work. Maybe this is a case where the old stereotype “videogames are for kids” could actually be helpful as a “won’t someone think of the CHILDREN?” hysteria might be the only way this would pass.


#7

Fuck me. I’d rather play Flappy Bird.


#8

Not only is it a broken model, it’s a broken game. I lasted 20 minutes before pulling, and it apparently left crapware behind, because that night, for the first time in months, my tablet got stuck in boot mode, and required me to reload from factory settings.

Yep. . . .EA all right. . . . . Flagshipping every game they touch. . .


#9

I thought this game was produced by some dodgy garage team with links to organised crime… but apparently it is worse than that… EA


#10

I’m not so sure that’s a law I’d want - that’s a massive overreach. You can already do this in casinos - alter your odds by paying more. If you’re serious about this, you should also pursue outlawing lottery tickets and make sure that any AAA video game title provides at least 40 hours of entertainment.


#11

You’d like to clear out 56 blocks of terrain? That will either cost you £69.99 or take nearly two months of clicking once a day.

Wait… what?

Is it a joke?


#12

I honestly don’t understand how the game has 17,000 positive reviews in the Play store. Are they all real? Or is EA sending in their bots?

And there are reviews like this. Did EA just pay the reviewer, or did they give them a version of the game with no micro-payments? The review talks of playing for a long time… When you hunt down the one-star reviews buried amid the five-star ones above, most people say the same thing as the reviews Cory linked – you can’t even play for ten minutes before you either have to fork over cash or step away from the game for a few hours.

Someone needs to look into how EA has managed to get themselves so many good reviews.


#13

Loved the original Dungeon Keeper. Got a $5 disc from a shop going out of business at around the turn of the Millennium. Fun game play. But this reincarnation demonstrates what’s wrong with the ‘free’ games of iOS, Android, & Facebook. Truly, I don’t mind in game purchase mechanics when they don’t completely stifle game play but too few actually follow that model. Almost all will throw you up against a brick wall of obstacles that you have to buy your way out of (and buy your way out again & again) or they force you into a waiting game where you at best get 20 minutes of real game play every few days.

Seriously, I never download games for my mobile devices. Much rather spend my time on console & PC games.


#14

It’s pretty standard practice for companies to buy themselves friends, likes, and good reviews. Shady, but it’s the norm. There are sites where you can buy them in bulk. For example: http://www.thesocialmarketeers.org/buy-apple-app-store-reviews/
http://cheap-socials.com/buy-facebook-likes/

And that’s just what I found with five seconds of searching.

It’s shady as shit. In other realms, for example… my friend says that lots of venues book bands based on how many Facebook likes they have. He’s taking the high road and not mass-buying, but it’s hard to compete.


#15

Of course they bought a ton of 5 star reviews. That’s how major mobile platform publishers work. Once a game amasses too many 1 star reviews to cancel out your 5 star reviews, they pull it and release the game again with a new gameid but the same name.

I got burned by this once already, with SimCity. I figured it would translate quite well to a tappy phone interface, but the application was horribly broken (several of the features didn’t work at all–like bridges or the economy) and then it disappeared from the app store only to re-emerge later with suddenly a huge number of 5 star reviews. I only went looking because I was trying to figure out why my version wasn’t updating anymore, and discovered what EA did.

Needless to say, I will never buy an EA mobile game ever again.


#16

I have little hope for change but in the face of overwhelming negativity I felt obligated to try finding some sort of save so mythic is given a chance to make things right. Plus, and this is the terrible thing, if you got rid of the timers it’s a fun game getting strangled to death.

And it’s from Mythic, and they made the warhammer RTS games for pc. I cannot think they willingly stuffed the overabundance of ‘pay me’ buttons all over the place.


#17

This one seems inexplicable, as it sounds completely broken by the payment dynamics. Successful games just hobble the gameplay to drive payments. Something like Candy Crush is a little more understandable, as it’s smartly put together so that you can’t easily notice you’re playing a slot machine game (which makes it more evil), and you can actually play it without paying (it just becomes much easier to play if you pay, because of how the levels are designed).


#18

For what it’s worth, the game itself is actually pretty engaging & charming, and it’s fun taking your little horde of baddies into another person’s dungeon to loot their gold. That said, I’m only a couple of days in and can already see that the time required to advance to higher levels is going to be ridiculous unless I’m willing to spend significant dollars (I’m not). EA did the same with their mobile version of Ultima - a fun game, but it became very obvious very soon that it would take a LOT of money to play it for any significant length of time.

It’s a shame, really. I can only hope that in 10 years we can look back and laugh at the short-lived, unsuccessful freemium model.


#19

Oozes style and it wouldn’t take much.

What chance is there of making a game to show how things /should/ hsave worked on mobile?


#20

The existing stock of good games isn’t going to go away, which I propose sets a lower bound on how bad games can get before people stop playing them entirely.