Famous authors' plots explained

ernest hemingway Charles Bukowski:

On the journey you drink beer from cold bottles, and peasant’s wine from the big leather sacks the fisherman gave you. When you arrive in the town square, you stop by a café for a bottle of champagne and a bottle of cheap wine. You hate the man you are with. You order more beer. Soon it will be time for lunch you will be in your underwear on the floor howling at the walls while classical music plays on a cheap radio. In the meantime you write some poetry.

That’s much better than either of my attempts. Well done. :+1:t3:

5 Likes

Spot on, except you left out mention of the joy he took in taking a really big dump.

Oh and classical music Mahler.

8 Likes

:joy:

:fu:t3: This.

3 Likes

Your frosted tips?

1 Like

Elsinore gets cold in Winter, so it is best to wear flannel undies to avoid getting a frosted tip.

2 Likes

Oh! So that is not a dagger I see before me?

1 Like

:rofl: :rofl: :rofl:

2 Likes

I’m a fellow of infinite jest

4 Likes

“Copyright is no longer a right.”

3 Likes

Aren’t you forgetting the drugs, and the technologies of reproduction?

3 Likes

Or more generally, “Look at this wonderful scientific/technological discovery that could change the world forever! Unfortunately the world will never know of it because we need to destroy it all for complicated reasons.”

3 Likes

James Joyce: I love hate Ireland it’s impossible to be an artist there I’m bummed about Parnell

1 Like

I love this sort of thing and I know it’s beside the point but the premise…

…I don’t think this is actually true. Though I guess I can’t speak for everyone, I generally hear them praised for either some sort of lasting underlying truth or influence on their art form. I think imagination is pretty far down the list of how a book ends up on your class syllabus.

2 Likes

William Hanna and Joseph Barbera

I would have gotten away with it, too, if not for those meddling kids.

7 Likes

That’s…actually perfect.

2 Likes

Christopher Marlowe: I just want to know how to do everything, and the love of a beautiful woman. What could go wrong? (in iambic pentameter)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe: Nothing desire I more than knowledge of all things on Earth and in Heaven. What could go wrong? (in two volumes)

Howard Philip Lovecraft: I want to know more. What could go wrong? (Squamously. Squamously, noisesomely and gibbous is how it goes wrong.)

7 Likes

Haruki Murakami: Average man is thrust into inexplicable circumstances, shows remarkable dispassion and composure throughout while having way more sex than should be humanly possible.

3 Likes

That works for Enid Blyton, too.

2 Likes

David Baldacci, anyone?

1 Like

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.