Florida management company bans tenants from using storm shutters as Hurricane Irma approaches


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/09/08/services-taylor-made.html


#2

When I think of the best example of common sense, I think Florida.


#3

I could understand if the tenants were going to hammer in some random lumber, but they have the shutters and the fittings for them, WTD?

Vargas said her lease says tenants are responsible to protect their own property from storms, but they’re still being told they can’t board up.


#4

Idiots.

I’d wager the management company’s corporate office is out of state. They likely are oblivious to the fact that boarding up the windows will protect their property and think they’ll end up with damage in the form of holes in the wall from where the shutters are attached. Alternatively some lawyer decided boarded up windows will trap people inside and is a liability problem.


#5

Gee, it’s like the management company wants people to get injured and die needlessly… and then have whatever survivors are left sue the everloving shit out of them, after the crisis is over.


#6

I have vowed never to live anywhere with an HOA long before this. But this is a gentle confirmation.


#7

I’d never live with an HOA either, but this story is about renters and their landlord.


#8

I came here to say that all property management companies suck. Happy to be free of that BS.

Fla Management Co: “Oh, you mean those shutters. We sold them to a sister property and didn’t put the proceeds on the HOA books. Is that wrong?”


#9

Reading comprehension is hard


#10

Tenants in Colony Park in West Palm Beach, Florida have been warned by their property management company Services Taylor Made ((407) 732-6850) that they are prohibited from putting shutters on their windows as a safety measure against the approaching Hurricane Irma.

That’s the sort of value aded news service I expect from boingboing.

meanwhile, here’s their website.


#11

This is clearly a situation where you violate your lease and demand they take you to court when they complain.


#12

No, actually this makes perfect sense… If the holding company wants to do what so many renters are doing across the country and replace their current tenants with higher-paying ones, they could go through the tedious process of making them all miserable enough to move out, or they could just forbid them from taking action to protect the property when a cat 5 hurricane is coming in so that the existing flats will be wrecked, their insurance will cover rebuilding pricier ones, and all their tenants will be too poor & exhausted to fight back. This is capitalism, folks.


#13

This is a case where you get it in writing and then forward it to your own insurance company.
ETA: …and also theirs.


#14

I’m thinking that corporate has just voided any insurance claims related to the storm. That’s some fine risk management there, Lou.


#15

Where’s that Bugs Bunny gif, @Papasan?


#16


#17

I really, really, really want to see how this story pans out and the reasoning. This is just fucking retarded.

News flash - if these windows break, there is going to be water damage to the unit and opens it up to mold damage. This is super expensive to fix, especially if you have multiple units.


#18

It will probably be decided after all the water damage that it makes more sense to knock them down and build something tailored to richer residents.

On the flip side if the residents break into the storage lockers and mount the shutters themselves they’ve probably violated their lease and can be easily given the heave-ho.


#19

It’s occured to me they’ll have to board up after the windows are smashed out in the storm.

I definitely want to see the follow up on this place.


#20

Even if you board up your own condo, if your neighbors don’t, yours will still suffer by collateral damage. Fires might get blocked by firewalls, but smoke and water still get through, and Irma is packing hella water. I’m also remembering the substandard construction revealed after Andrew ripped up houses and insurance adjusters discovered the ugly truth.