Giorgio Moroder: from Donna Summer to Bowie to Blondie Daft Punk


#1

[Read the post]


#2

AND he did a whole remix album of Juke Joint Jezebel by KMFDM.

I can only find two samples on youtube, but it shows quite a different sound for the same song.


#3

While I prefer The Chase, THIS track is more apropos for the BBBBS:


#4

“From Here to Eternity” is an acknowledged classic, but I think his “E=MC2” album is pretty underrated. It’s a live-to-digital album (1979!) with catchy songs and hilarious “Bee Gees” falsetto vocals. None more Moroder if you ask me.


#5

A true innovator, and the man behind countless classics of dance, rock, and pop. He basically composed the post-disco pop soundtrack of the late 1970s and 1980s, and his influence on the modern day EDM scene is huge.

Fun fact: he also dabbled in automobiles and architecture.

He was the co-designer behind this oddball Countach/Testarossa love child, the Cizeta-Moroder V16T:

… and wanted to build this… thing… in Los Angeles:

(sorry, I couldn’t find a better rendering)

Yeah, the guy is an eccentric genius but he’s one of my musical heroes.


#6

For me there is no substitute, nor comparator to I feel love. It was my favourite song as a child. I recall getting lost on the dance floor when it was current. Flashing lights and a sea of sound.

Seriously it is the only song that has a call on being the greatest song ever for me.

I lost myself in the modulations as a child and have never got out. I’m not one to listen to old music in general but for some reason that has never grown old for me.


#7

Yes; the first word in these kinds of posts should be Living, as long as the second word is not Dead.


#8

On the Radio Vol. I & II was the first record I ever bought, and I’m pretty sure “I Feel Love” is where my love of electronic music came from.


#9

I always thought of it more as a shameless rip-off of the Diablo.


#10

If anything it’s the other way around, this was Gandini’s original design for the Diablo, but when Chrysler took over the company they made a lot of changes to the styling.

The engine is suitably bizarre too, two V8s in a common block.


#11

I still can’t decide if I like his recent version of Tom’s Diner but since I keep going back to figure it out, there must be something there


#12

That song is just ageless to me. Even nearly 40 years later it still sounds “modern” to me. Not many pieces of music can do that.

ETA: interesting blog post I read many years ago about the INL bassline.

http://musicthing.blogspot.com/2004/12/moroder-week-pt-6-most-famous-bassline.html


#13

Wow, that’s even weirder than the Veyron’s W16 (which at least has a space saving advantage)


#14

I don’t want to fetishise old tech and analogue but that sequence and the modulations, I think, encapsulate what people admire about mono modular synthesis: one note passing through the modulation matrix can be so, so deep. That sequence is made by the delay patterns. It’s no coincidence that contemporary classical was discovering the richness possible in loops, delays, and phase shifting in that era also

I now feel bad that I have made several posts about this and not even mentioned the extraordinary vocals. I wonder is part of the appeal the way that Donna Summers singing invites falsetto approximation? Her vocals are so female and yet so attainable for a man also. I’ve sung along with this tune for most of my life. I used to mix records in and out of this during extended sessions. If you have record players still I think you should go find yourselves a copy of the patrick Cowley remix as well: one should have a fifteen minute version of I feel love in ones arsenal.

Mind you I think you probably need Tantas hills of Kathmandu too .

You tube doesn’t allow me play any versions of Cowley’s remix so here is his remix of Tantra. Though you really should check all his work out with Sylvester etc. there was a a record out a few years ago of his porn soundtracks which I dug.


#15

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.