Google promises no more use of its artificial intelligence tech in weapons

#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/06/07/be-slightly-less-evil.html

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#2

The Google makes a big deal out of this, the more convinced I am that they already have other programs in place.

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#3

Right now, even.

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#4

Well at least until they can figure out how to use the weapons as an ad platform.

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#5

Thank goodness the military could never develop an AI of their own.

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#6

Well they could take a nod from nascar and just slap sponsorship decals all over the murderbots.

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#7

Luckily targeting computers aren’t weapons, right?

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#8

533045396

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#9

“… search & rescue…”

Maybe Google could team up with Elon Musk and buy Tracey Island.

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#10

So I googled “Google murderbots” and this is what I got


I think everyone should google “Google murderbots” and the then we can watch the internet freak fuck out once it starts trending.
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#11

I don’t trust Google’s promises.
The very least I expect is a pinkie swear.

#12

I’m on it.

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#13

Doesn’t the Geneva convention generally require affixing a sponsor logo to your combatants?

(Yes, I realize that this doesn’t apply to current gen murderbots, but once the ‘robot’ covers something less like a missile doing a few seconds of terminal guidance and more like a T-1000 labelling requirements might well be extended: We’ll see if bots are required to provide hostnameme, machine type model and serial number on capture.)

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#14

at the very least, the Robot Battle Convention does.

http://www.robotbattles.com/

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#15

Sure, i believe you Google.

#16

Whew!

#17

Interesting, considered list. I wonder what’s not on it (and why they removed the evil term before and never put it back). I trust them slightly less far than I could comfortably spit a rat

#18

The stuff that’s Classified in one way or another you (or the majority of G employees for that matter) will never hear about.

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#19

Pro-tip and de-bullshitifier: in typical gov contracts, the contractor does not have the ability or right to terminate the contract. There are measures that can be taken by G if they’re really serious about it that may lead to the gov cancelling, but then again it may cause G to land on a list of companies not to do biz with.

#20

Well, for one, “internationally accepted norms” is a wonderfully vague term that can allow for a whole lot of surveillance technology.

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