Google reaches into customers' homes and bricks their gadgets


#1

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#2

This sort of behaviour is precisely why silicon valley -should- develop smart triggers for firearms whether there is profit in it or nay. Just an act of self preservation really, to give themselves the ability to brick firearms, if this is how they’ll be treating people.


#3

Well, in the early years of the phonograph some makers did design their players to only accept records from their own company, thankfully this never took off.

I look at this issue of “bricking” devices and just think there will be a luddite-esque backlash out of frustration.


#4

It sounds like they’re shutting off the servers (which this device relies on), not actively “reaching into homes and bricking” anything. Yes, either way the device is no longer useful, but shutting down a server (which is what they are doing) is a lot different than pushing an update that bricks a device (which is not what they are doing).


#5

The cognitive dissonance here is dizzying. Possibly it’s just for effect?


#6

It shouldn’t be on Google to continue to operate servers, agreed.

The problem is that a Revolv owner can’t run (or choose) their own server legally.


#7

I was wondering if this device had to be connected to the internet to work or that was simply a convenience…it certainly sounds like it has to. This doesn’t surprise me much, the PC gaming community has expressed concerns over multiplayer servers hosted by companies since the day they came out…it’s all part of the gamble. Realistically if enough push comes from the consumers the market will have a provider that makes hardware with some type of open software (or compatibility, such as DD-WRT).


#8

Total bullshit!

But this is the correct direct result of apple, Samsung, and everybody else using their own format and locking it down.

With[out] interoperability and open systems, we’re all just one (giving us the) business-decision away from being ripped off.


#9

From years of hearing about custom servers for old games they surely could permit some upgrade to allow all those customers to connect with a custom server if they chose. I know they don’t even care enough to do so since this is basically them pulling a microsoft (extend, embrace, extinguish) but you’d think they could hold the option for ransom. I’m sure they’d get some of their money back unless they think all the people will just buy a brand new gadget of identical functionality from the company that a few months ago ruined the one they already paid for.


#10

What if I have fire alarm connected: if my house is looted or burns down, can I sue Google for intentionally breaking my home security?


#11

That’s probably one of the first things Revolv addressed in their EULA.


#12

Apple is way ahead here. They already pushed an OS update that bricks all third party VGA adaptors.


#13

Did no one read their motto and think, “Hey, is this evil?”

Two other options:

  1. Just let it go. Ok, you want to use Nest as the main product, just ignore the other one. Let them go obsolete on their own and stop doing support or updates. You don’t have to brick them.

  2. Give everyone who owns one a Nest.

So basically in the future, all the retro, non-networked appliances will be the things to own, because otherwise one could have their toaster bricked mid-ego. Shit, they could even hold you for ransom… What if they paired up with energy companies - you shit won’t work until your bill is paid.

OH gawd, its getting dark in my head again. I better get back to work…


#14

I view all cloud-based services as ephemeral. I’m just along for the ride until I have to go somewhere else or pony up the time and resources to roll my own solution (c.f. Google Reader).

It’s still a dick move when they could open up the APIs to a third party, or just open source the whole thing (but then, what does that do for the value of those sweet, sweet patents?).

As an aside, i think it is incredibly ironic that the BB Store has sold “lifetime” subscriptions to VPN services for pretty much the same reasons.


#15

If only there where a community which developed software and hardware that didn’t have this DMCA problem because the source code and manufacturing details were open to public use. A community that didn’t rely on copyright and patents to earn money but instead relied on service and delivery as income streams would be great.
If such a community existed then I’m sure BB readers would support it, right?


#16

Alphabet Inc. has a motto?

ah, yes, you’re partly right - found it:

We also like that it means alpha‑bet (Alpha is investment return above benchmark), which we strive for!

#17

I predict a class action lawsuit. And I predict that it will be settled with a couple of million for the lawyers and a $20 coupon on a Nest product for the users.


#18

You know I’m pretty sure the electric company already works like that…and they don’t even need some smart appliance spying on you. (Well there’s that damn meter they install, but some call that theft if you remove it.)


#19

Unless there’s a mandatory arbitration / no class action clause in the EULA. In which case, the users are boned.


#20

Yeah, but that takes time to send some out, multiple notices etc. What about more “gentle reminders”. Turn off the waterless water heater. Turn off 3/4th of the smart bulbs. Turn off the TV. Don’t completely shut off the power, sending a person out there, etc, just making shit inconvenient.