Have "elder goths" figured out how to age more successfully?

Yes, exactly. I was thinking about this more and trying to find the words to describe it better. It seems like as the number of genres and sub genres of music have increased, that defining your generation by a style of music has become less useful. My kids are 28 and 30 currently and if they met someone new of the same age I think they would be more likely to bond over video games they played growing up or pokemon than they would with music. In 15 years I suspect today’s teenagers will be reminiscing more about the time that thing happened on TikTok rather than about that time that guy did the thing at a concert. That’s not to say that kids today don’t love music, just that there might be other ways they prefer to define their generation’s identity that has nothing to do with how it was done before.

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Yep, for me I loved “Xorcist” (don’t judge), and that led to other music, and that led to my being adopted in.

but it was a weird thing. In one house there was an uber goth who hand made corsets with actual bone inserts, a football dudebro who happened to be gay, and a nerdy larp-type, and everyone got along just fine. I guess if you’re looked down on for a particular aspect of you, it’s easier not to judge others who are getting the same.

btw: http://www.xorcist.com/ (my favorite was probably “Iron Helix” off of “Phantoms”)[just re-listened, and I still like it :slight_smile: ]

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Cultural identity is an interesting thing. I’ve been in similar situations as you where everyone seemed very different on the surface but had some form of commonality or shared experience that wasn’t always obvious to others. Finding fellow odd balls can be very comforting and the diversity leads to whole new worlds of interest you may have never experienced otherwise.

My company’s blocking access to that bands site. I will check later from my personal laptop. :slight_smile:

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Serious question: Is it possible to casually interact with a Goth, for, say, an hour in 'neutral 'surroundings and (assuming reasonable intelligence and experience) not realize that the person you were interacting with was a Goth?

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I called myself a rivethead, but rarely went to great lengths to dress up at concerts, and less during the day.

I think for Goth or Grunge or Industrial or whatever sub-genre most people I interacted with, like me, dressed in a certain way and probably considered that their favorite kind of music, but certainly not the only kind of music they listened to, much less the only sort of people they enjoyed hanging out with.

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Still kicking myself for missing LTJ Bukem a couple years ago here in Pittsburgh

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Yes very much so this. I was trying to think back to how I referenced myself way back then. I think if asked what I was into I might have just said “new music” with what that meant continually evolving and expanding.

I went just now and looked at the wiki for Urgh!. Some of those bands seem now like strange bed fellows but at the time they were all new music even though they didn’t share a single sound.

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Even when I’m wearing the comfy leggings and tunics in bright colors that my daughter gives me, I’m called out as a Goth.

On second thought, they don’t say “Goth”, they say “vampire” and look unconvinced when I tell them I can eat garlic and look at religious articles without bursting into flame.

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Anyone who thinks that goth music is golden oldies of the 80’s has been spending too much time getting old themselves and not enough time keeping their ear to the rails.
May I recommend one of many excellent modern bands & albums that spin perfectly on the modern goth dancefloor? Goth is by no means frozen in time friend.

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I haven’t listened to this track yet, but goth is definitely still around. I’ve been on Projekt’s email list since forever, and Sam Rosenthal’s still cranking out records, his own stuff and other musician’s stuff.

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Cool, thank you for sharing the album. I like the sound.

I didn’t mean to say modern goth music was or wasn’t still evolving. One thing I am proud of is that many of the alternative genres from the 80s continued to grow and morph. What I was saying is that goth any songs from 30 or 40 years ago that were popular then and are popular now are the new golden oldies. And it feels really strange to say to be honest.

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Well said.
Yes this is the strange nature of sharing ideas through these mediums. Your response is well received. It is definitely strange…and yet what is old is also new I think. Perhaps Terrance McKenna’s notion of the end of novelty is in reality a movement into the Meta of being present where we enjoy the overlapping harmonies and dissonance in the most delightful way like waves lapping on the shore.

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Yes, agreed. I think as genres has split into smaller and smaller sub-genres that the utility has diminished. For a long time I was very hung up on such things but eventually learned to enjoy the music that speaks to me and not worry about what bucket a marketing dudebro thought a band belongs to. :slight_smile:

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