Hit songs, analyzed by their contemporary obscurity


#1

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#2

4953 when I took one for the team and watched it. The count’s going down!


#3

Still seems to be at 4953 when I watched it too. I guess YouTube’s view stats don’t update in realtime?


#4

Also: this went to #1? I have zero recollection of this song. I generally don’t listen to tons of pop music, but I’d like to think I have at least a passing knowledge of the genre. I guess I do not.


#5

This is great! And yay, Very Small Array! I just love Dorothy Gambrell… if you guys aren’t subscribed to the Fun Club, you should be… If she does it again in 2015, it’s totally worth the $100 or whatever it costs.

http://catandgirl.com/?page_id=3258


#6

So “Help!” from 1965 is the 6’th least obscure song in an absolute sense.
And “Help!” from 1965 is the 6th least obscure song in a time-adjusted sense.

Whereas “Satisfaction” from 1965 is not in the top ten in an absolute sense.
And “Satisfaction” from 1965 passes the “Help!” to get to 5th place in time-adjusted ratings?

I feel like there is something really weird going on (maybe just a mistake putting Help! in the absolute ratings?)


#7

Sic transit gloria mundi, as the uncool kids say.


#8


#9

Good Lord, that Clay Aiken song is painfully bad. Hard to believe that songwriter wrote four songs for Born to Die, but there it is. He’s one of those people who…eh…I guess it’s not my thing. Sounds like the kind of schmaltzy music you play for the first dance at a wedding reception.

For some perverse reason, I want to do a mix of this song with the opening sequence of Enterprise, though.


#10

And, yesterday, I got the list of the songs from this graph in the mail, along with 3 business cards which state “I’m not even sure why I’m at this meeting”… Fun Club is the best.


#11

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