In 60 seconds, security researchers can clone the master hotel-room keys for 140,000 hotels in 160 countries


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/04/25/hospitality-industry.html


#2

"Most probably Mossad has a capability to do something like this,"

Those guys have all the good shit.


#3

the locks are not connected to the internet and can’t update themselves, so it’s up to hoteliers to see the notification, download the patch, and hire technicians to manually apply it to each lock in their hotels, one at a time.

Labor intensive but good i suppose? Last thing i want is for my hotel door to have a shitty IoT lock.


#4

I sincerely doubt that a technician really has to be hired to touch each lock.

I’m sure the underpaid Latinas who clean the rooms can load the updates while they are cleaning up. The cost to train them to execute a series of steps each time will not be earthshattering.


#5

I was thinking the same, but maintenance can likely do it as well. But i would also presume that hotels have an IT person or company as well, so there’s no shortage of options.


#6

It would most likely be maintenance or whoever maintains the lock systems. At [RedactedCo], it’s a combination of departments.


#7

Checkmate?


#8

Checkmate on your checkmate?


#9

Can they bypass a door security bar?
door_bar


#10

The door bar clearly needs some scissors, which as we all know, comprehensively defeat paper.


#11

I mean anyone determined enough could find a way

Can’t really use a security bar for the room while you’re not using it though, i would be more concerned about someone getting in while i’m gone.


#12

Ok, that’s way down on my list. I keep belongings in a locked bag when using a hotel room. If I’m really worried, the locked bag is also attached/locked to a piece of furniture. Any thief who successfully breaks into the bag or takes the entire thing has to be really motivated. In the end, it’s just stuff, though.

IMO, hearing someone open (or trying to open) your hotel room door at night is far worse. A buddy of mine rejected a pass from an officer during a cruise vacation. He told her that as part of the security team, he could get into any cabin. Since she was traveling solo, she wound up sleeping on the sofa in another friend’s cabin for the rest of the trip. She told me later she might have remained on her own, if she had some way to bar the door.


#13

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